Georgia Buoys Offshore Wind Power

The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) just recently released a “finding of no significant impact” for Southern Company’s proposed offshore wind energy study equipment. The draft environmental assessment found that a meteorological tower or buoys offshore Georgia would have negligible environmental impacts.

Duke Energy’s Commitment to Overspend on Coal Plants

Duke Energy is banking on charging customers in the Carolinas an estimated $7.7 billion just to keep its existing fleet of coal plants running. For at least thirteen of those units (at 5 plants), however, it is pretty clear that the additional investment is not worthwhile, and Duke Energy should change its plans. What’s worse, [...]

Tax Policy Can Create Level Playing Field

While federal tax policy has helped create the level playing field needed for a surge of wind power growth, regular expiration and renewal of the Production Tax Credit (PTC) has also caused a lot of unnecessary steps backward. All while other forms of energy enjoy long-term policy support.

“Traditional” vs “New”: Olympics and Utilities

As both the Sochi Winter Olympic & Special Olympic games have now drawn to a close, more than a few commentators sniffed about a “disappointing” Olympic games for the USA. Speedskating coach Bob Fenn reportedly said, “It’s like the fall of the Roman Empire.” One newspaper commented, “It’s just not the year the U.S. hoped [...]

40 Religious Groups Practicing Creation Care with Wind Turbines

Creation Care merges faith with proactive solutions to protect God’s creation. Next week, the season of Lent begins for millions of faithful people around the world. To mirror the 40 days of Lent, here are 40 churches, religious schools and faith-based organizations around the world that are putting their faith to work by promoting wind energy.

19 1/2 Similarities Between Sailboats and Wind Turbines

Wind turbines and sailboats share many commonalities. Both are super advanced, highly popular and lovable, low cost and protective of the environment, but do you know all of the 19 1/2 ways wind turbines and sailboats are similar?

Big Wind Turbines, Big Opportunity for the South

The Department of Energy just announced a $2 million funding opportunity for taller wind turbines, which is big news for everyone in the South. Not only could the funding go to a Southern business, but also the research to accompany the funding announcement shows a giant resource potential in the South that has been previously largely unknown.

Save Weiss Lake, Build a Wind Farm

Weiss Lake (located in Cherokee and Etowah Counties, Alabama) has the noble distinction of “Crappie Fishing Capital of the World” and is the lifeblood of Northeast Alabama’s tourism. The lake was created in the 1950s and 1960s as Alabama Power developed a hydroelectric dam on the Coosa River. Several organizations have developed in an effort to improve and protect Weiss Lake and the surrounding watershed. Wind farms may provide a new opportunity to advance those protection efforts. Wind farms use modern technology for electric generation, emit no air pollution and consume no water, and at the same time, offer local communities economic development that can spur reinvestment into local programs and infrastructure; key factors that make wind energy a clean power resource and a new tool to help save Weiss Lake.

Wind Energy Worth the Investment

To support this American-made industry and many other sources of energy, President George H.W. Bush passed the Production Tax Credit in the early 1990s. Every president since then has renewed this tax credit in order to reduce the overall tax burden on the relatively new wind industry, highlighting its wide bipartisan support. The Production Tax Credit for wind energy has historically been renewed on somewhat of an annual basis; but because of the dysfunction of the current Congress, the tax credit has recently lapsed.

Sounds like a Wind Farm Ban

Generally, wind turbines have been compared to refrigerators in terms of their relative sound level. According to the EPA, sound levels at 55 dB outside and 45 dB inside are unlikely to cause annoyance. For example, if a proposed regulation is below 45 decibels (the EPA level for indoor noise), it should be fairly clear that the proposing regulator is not interested in allowing wind development but is instead aiming to ban by regulation.