Remembering TN’s Coal Ash Problems After NC’s Dan River Disaster

In the wake of the recent coal ash disaster at Duke Energy’s Dan River plant in Eden, NC, environmental groups have become increasingly concerned with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s (TDEC) handling of toxic coal ash within the state. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Tennessee’s coal ash impoundments can hold up [...]

Mississippi is the “sunshine state” for the Tennessee Valley Authority

Where are the best spots to build solar power in the Tennessee Valley Authority? It turns out, many of them are in Mississippi! We recently obtained 16 years of simulated solar power production data from Clean Power Research for the Tennessee Valley Authority region, looking at 26 sites scattered from east to west, and north [...]

Want to learn more about the Fukushima nuclear disaster? Read this book, come to Atlanta!

Just a month before the third anniversary of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan and led to the still-ongoing nuclear disaster at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear complex, a new book is being released documenting the harrowing events. Join Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and our partner, Georgia Women’s Action for New Directions (Georgia WAND), [...]

Shout Out: Good Carbon Reduction News from TVA

OK, I admit it; in our watchdog/clean energy advocate role, we at SACE are often critical of our regional utilities. Yet, we have and will continue to call out positive developments and give credit where credit is due for movement in the right direction. Here is a big shout out for the biggest public power [...]

Solar Deserves a Shout Out!

Today marks the Solar Energy Industries Association’s (SEIA) 40th anniversary, and the nation’s first “Shout Out for Solar” day!  And there are many reasons to “shout out” for solar. Over the past forty years technology gains and enormous reductions in price have moved solar from an R&D pipe dream to the energy source Americans want [...]

Burning Coal, Burning Cash in the Southeast

The cost of importing coal is a drain on the economies of Southeastern states, particularly in those states that rely heavily on coal-fired power.  In an updated report, “Burning Coal, Burning Cash” the Union of Concerned Scientists use updated market data to determine just how much money is leaving the Southeast to pay for coal. [...]

UCS Report: Wind Cheaper than Keeping Alabama Coal Plants Alive

Newly updated research shows that Alabama is still high on the list of states with coal plants that may be more expensive to maintain than to replace with cleaner sources, as we noted in an earlier blog. The report, an update of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Ripe for Retirement using 2012 numbers (the most [...]

Five year since Kingston: A December to Remember

This opinion piece was written by Ulla Reeves, SACE’s High Risk Energy Program Director, and was published in the Knoxville News Sentinel on December 22, 2014. This is the final post in a five part series commemorating the fifth anniversary of the Kingston coal ash disaster, highlighting communities throughout the Southeast impacted by coal ash [...]

How the Polar Vortex is Fueled by and a Threat to Our Energy Infrastructure

“More and more Arctic sea ice is melting during summer months. The more ice that melts, the more the Arctic Ocean warms. The ocean radiates much of that excess heat back to the atmosphere in winter, which disrupts the polar vortex. Data taken over the past decade indicate that when a lot of Arctic sea ice disappears in the summer, the vortex has a tendency to weaken over the subsequent winter, if related atmospheric conditions prevail over the northern Atlantic Ocean.”

2013: The Year in Review

Seasons greetings from all of us here at SACE!  Before we take some time to enjoy the holiday season, we wanted to pause and celebrate our accomplishments over the last year.  We couldn’t have done it without your support! It’s been a great year across the Southeast for much of our important work.  We’ve seen [...]