Electric Vehicles: Driving Reduced Demand for Offshore Oil, Part 2 of 3 – “The Advancement of Electric Vehicles”

This is Part 2 of our blog series, Electric Vehicles: Driving Reduced Demand for Offshore Oil, which shows that given the advancements in vehicle electrification, expanding offshore drilling for oil and natural gas into protected areas (covered in Part 1) is intrinsically risky and unnecessary. Part 3 of the series, coming tomorrow, will provide analysis demonstrating [...]

Women DRIVING Electric Transportation: Catherine Teebay, Forth

This blog is part of a series called Women in EVs – celebrating women leading on the development and adoption of electric vehicles. Other blogs in this series can be found here.  We are pleased to introduce Catherine Teebay as this week’s featured EV champion.  Catherine is a leader in EV advocacy in the Northwest, where she is [...]

Women DRIVING Electric Transportation: Lisa Poger

This blog is the first in a series called Women in EVs – celebrating women leading on the development and adoption of electric vehicles. Other blogs in this series can be found here.   In recognition of International Women’s Month and upcoming Earth Month, we are taking a look at women helping to DRIVE electric transportation forward across the [...]

Drive Electric Event: Day of EV Learning in Florida

We were pleased to host the first 2018 Palm Harbor National Drive Electric Week event at the Palm Harbor United Methodist Church on Saturday, March 3, 2018. It was a tremendous success full of learning and driving electric!  It included ‘Ride and Drives’ from two dealerships: The RBC Group, Inc. and Fitzgerald Chrysler, where participants had [...]

Overcoming Barriers to Driving Electric

In our Electrify the South monthly newsletters (sign up here if you haven’t already!) we often pose a survey question to learn more about the questions, thoughts or ideas our followers have about driving electric.  One of our recent questions was, “What is keeping you from purchasing an electric vehicle?” Here, we share the responses, [...]

Tesla Model 3 – Four Day Test Drive Review

This blog was written by Jeff Cohen, Founder, Atlanta Electric Vehicle Development Coalition and Georgia EVentures, LLC and Treasurer of EV Club of the South. Jeff currently owns a Tesla Model S. On my last trip to the Bay area, I was lucky enough to score a rental of a brand new Tesla Model 3 through [...]

Energy Storage: Charging Ahead in 2018

Duke Florida plans to add 50 MW of battery storage.
Kentucky Power’s IRP has plans for adding 10 MW of battery storage by 2025.
Duke Energy in North Carolina will install a 9 MW battery system in transmission-constrained Asheville.
West Virginia’s Laurel Mountain wind farm has a co-located 32 MW / 8 MWh lithium-ion battery system.
Duke Energy’s Notrees Windpower Project in western Texas is upgrading from lead-acid batteries to a 36 MW lithium-ion system.
Southern Company is testing a 1 MW / 2 MWh lithium-ion battery system in Cedartown, Georgia.
Southern Company and Gulf Power are testing a 250 kW / 1 MWh Tesla Powerpack in Pensacola, Florida.
Chattanooga, Tennessee’s Electric Power Board (EPB) has energized a 100kW/400kWh Vanadium flow battery.
Entergy New Orleans paired its new 1 MW solar PV facility with a 500 kWh lithium-ion battery system.
Arkansas Electric Cooperative Company began evaluating battery storage in 2015 for its IRP.
Dominion Energy (Virginia) has an IRP that evaluates battery storage, and even pumped-hydro storage.

Longer Range EVs are Here NOW

When we think about electric vehicles (EVs) – range is an overarching theme. How far can they really go? According to the United States Department of Transportation, the average American travels just 36 miles per day. Although many of us have no idea how much we actually travel and aren’t in the habit of researching transportation [...]

EV Range: How far can an electric vehicle take you?

The most frequent question I get when talking about electric vehicles (EVs) is how far can they go?  There is no single answer — it depends on your choice of EV! Today, there are now a growing number of diverse EVs on the market. Battery electric vehicles run exclusively on electricity via batteries (often referred [...]

Time for Virgin Islands to Transfer Power, to Renewables

There’s already a high level of self-sufficiency in St. Croix – where many, many homes rely almost entirely on rainwater cisterns for their freshwater supply. As batteries and residential renewable energy become cheaper, many residents may willfully follow Mr. Boyd’s footsteps, and begin to fully opt-out of the Virgin Island electric system by going off grid. But for economies of scale, utility-scale renewables and large batteries can pack a big economic punch. Lower systemwide power prices can help reduce electric bills, but also attract new companies seeking paradise on a dime. Meanwhile, brandishing ecological credentials could improve the islands’ largest industry: tourism. In the Netherlands, tourists readily pay for windmill and wind farm excursions.
As the Virgin Islands celebrate the 100th anniversary of Transfer Day, let’s hope it won’t take another 100 years for renewable energy.