Time for Virgin Islands to Transfer Power, to Renewables

There’s already a high level of self-sufficiency in St. Croix – where many, many homes rely almost entirely on rainwater cisterns for their freshwater supply. As batteries and residential renewable energy become cheaper, many residents may willfully follow Mr. Boyd’s footsteps, and begin to fully opt-out of the Virgin Island electric system by going off grid. But for economies of scale, utility-scale renewables and large batteries can pack a big economic punch. Lower systemwide power prices can help reduce electric bills, but also attract new companies seeking paradise on a dime. Meanwhile, brandishing ecological credentials could improve the islands’ largest industry: tourism. In the Netherlands, tourists readily pay for windmill and wind farm excursions.
As the Virgin Islands celebrate the 100th anniversary of Transfer Day, let’s hope it won’t take another 100 years for renewable energy.

Solar Customer to Central Georgia EMC: No Justification For Discriminating Against Solar Customers

Our family became interested in going solar in spring of 2015 to save money and help the environment. We did extensive research, including multiple discussions with our power provider, Central Georgia EMC , and a several solar installers, and finally made the investment once it was clear that it was a prudent thing to do. Fast forward two years, and Central Georgia EMC (CGEMC) has violated our original agreement and enacted unjustified fees against solar households like ours. The EMC cannot give a good explanation as to why they are cheating solar customers. We are waiting for a proper explanation, and as is to be expected from any business, some basic customer service. Here is our story.

After Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, Solar Booms in the Land of the Rising Sun

Saturday, March 11, 2017 marks the 6-year anniversary of the devastating earthquake and subsequent tsunami that hit Japan and killed more than 19,000 people. The disaster also led to the triple meltdown at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear facility. It’s staggering to learn that more than 70,000 people still have not gone home since the disaster due to [...]

The SC House’s Billion-Dollar Solar Opportunity

A bill before the South Carolina House Ways and Means Committee presents a nearly one-and-a-half billion-dollar investment opportunity for the state if it ultimately passes, and offers the opportunity to close the investment gap between South Carolina and its neighbors when it comes to solar and substantially increase local government revenue. The South Carolina Senate has already passed the bill with overwhelming support (38-4 vote), and SACE encourages the Committee to support the bill and help open the doors to major investment in a clean, reliable, cost-effective energy technology for South Carolina’s future.

Retired Fighter Pilot Responds to “Fact Free” Attacks on Wind Farm in NC

As a native North Carolinian and self-professed clean energy enthusiast, I have really been scratching my head lately over recent pushback on our state’s first large-scale wind farm. To catch you up on the issue, the online retail giant Amazon recently flipped the switch on a 208-megawatt wind farm, located outside of Elizabeth City in eastern North Carolina. As [...]

One EV Driver’s Three Year Report on Driving a Nissan Leaf

This is an expert post from a blog written by Steve O’Neil of Asheville, North Carolina. Steve is an advocate for clean, green, renewable energy technologies.

Jumbo’s Green Side: Sustainability at Tufts University

Ivy-covered walls and tree-lined campuses are pretty much de rigueur at New England’s countless colleges and universities, so it takes more than landscaping to earn a ‘Green College’ label. Half a century of environmental leadership coupled with ongoing efforts to green campus operations – from energy usage and infrastructure to food sourcing and academic offerings – have earned my undergraduate alma mater, Tufts University, a silver rating from the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) and a green college ranking from the Princeton Review.

More Corporations Going Green, Southeastern States Are Lagging

corporations are increasingly interested in using renewable energy to power their operations and meet their sustainability goals. Both the ease and success of corporate procurement of renewables is highly dependent on the state and utility policies where the corporations are located.

Brights Ideas at University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Deep in Louisiana’s Cajun Country, there’s a renewable energy research center dedicated to studying solar energy and biopower. And it smells like barbecue. Located in Crowley, Louisiana, the Cleco Alternative Energy Center is sponsored by Cleco Power, LLC, and operated by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

How Solar Could Help Replace Coal in Central Florida

Lakeland, FL leaders now acknowledge that retiring the McIntosh 3 coal-fired power generator is a question of when, not if. Lakeland Electric, which operates the 364MW plant and co-owns it with Orlando Utilities Commission, is poised to lead Florida utilities away from coal and toward cleaner energy choices, but thus far is hesitating. Solar energy, combined with gas or with cutting edge batteries, could shift the balance for this forward-thinking utility.