Solar In The Southeast, Fall Update

Thanks to weak or non-existent policies, inconsistent incentives, and a myriad of other excuses, the Southeast, as a whole, has yet to live up to its high solar potential. The last several months have brought some interesting developments though, some good and some challenging. Here’s a quick overview of the key takeaways, from North to South.

Georgia Tax Exemption Can Improve Project Economics

Georgia has a number of tax exemptions that could potentially apply to solar and other electric power generation projects. One that can really impact project economics is Georgia’s tangible personal property tax exemption for manufacturers. Whether or not that exemption applies to power projects, including solar and wind projects, is a tricky question – there is no clear line for power project eligibility. As of about a year ago, Georgia stopped giving advance approval (or denial) of eligibility for the exemption. And Georgia does not give written opinions regarding eligibility.

At D.C. conservative conference, clean energy is ‘now a family value’

onservatives from throughout the Southeast and Midwest challenged their colleagues Thursday to step up their public education and lobbying for clean energy in Congress and in state capitals. This is a guest post originally published by Southeast Energy News.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: NC Governor Pat McCrory

2016 Candidate Series: Leadership from a state’s governor is critical to setting the tone for energy policies, like REPS, and this blog series aims to inform voters on the policy stances regarding energy and climate issues that face North Carolina. First we evaluate current North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory, who is running for re-election this November. Pat McCrory worked for Duke Energy for 29 years and served as Charlotte’s longest-running mayor before retiring in 2008 to run for Governor of North Carolina. Prior to his 2012 gubernatorial election, Governor McCrory also served as a champion for Americans for Prosperity, the Koch brothers-backed anti-clean energy organization.

South Carolinians are eagerly filling up solar incentive programs

The sun is rising on the Palmetto State, as scores of customers are rushing to take advantage of the 2014 solar-enabling legislation, Act 236. Recently, Duke Energy announced that its South Carolina customers have received $5 million in solar rebates since the start of its incentive program roughly a year ago. This is great news [...]

Florida Power & Light – Solar Leader or Solar Laggard?

Florida Power & Light (FPL) professes to be a solar leader. According to FPL, “Florida’s clean energy landscape is bright.” FPL touts that it’s tripling the amount of solar it’s generating for customers this year as if that’s a huge accomplishment to be celebrated. In fact, the utility goes so far as to claim that [...]

Guest Blog: Florida Solar Businesses Speak Out Against Amendment 1

This is a guest blog from the Erika Dunayer with Florida Solar Energy Industries Association (FlaSEIA) who is a non-profit professional association of companies. Since 1977, FlaSEIA has been dedicated to protecting and promoting the interests of the solar energy industry in Florida.

What do Alpharetta GA and Asheville NC have in common this weekend?

Turns out electric vehicles can bring people together and help save the planet! We are thrilled to announce Alpharetta’s Mayor David Belle Isle and race car driver Leilani Munter will be joining SACE and allies at two separate events this weekend. As part of National Drive Electric Week, SACE has helped to organize local events in Alpharetta, Georgia (metro Atlanta) and Asheville, North Carolina where our special guests will be in attendance to promote electric vehicles and clean energy.

Utility-Backed Amendment 1 Blocks the Sun

Florida is the Sunshine State, right? But you wouldn’t know it by looking at Florida rooftops. There are 9 million electricity customers, yet less than 12,000 solar rooftop systems. Even though Florida is one of the largest electricity markets in the country, it ranked 17th in solar development last year. So, the state shouldn’t be [...]

Solar for Low-income Communities and More! EPA’s Clean Energy Incentive Program

Southeastern states may soon have an added incentive for developing energy efficiency and renewable energy resources that directly benefit low-income communities and utility customers. These potential new incentives come in the form of draft federal regulatory language, which the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is working to finalize as part of the entire rulemaking process for the Clean Power Plan (CPP).

This program, known as the Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP), is an early-action, voluntary piece of the larger CPP aimed at ensuring communities who suffered the negative effects of fossil-fuel energy generation and economically disadvantaged communities see real benefits from increased clean energy development. Although utilities, state agencies, industry, and the general public have all weighed in on pieces of the CEIP in previous CPP related comment period, the current EPA document open for comment will become the official design details for the CEIP. Comments can be sent directly to EPA (info on how to do that here) and are due by 11:59pm, Monday, August 29th.