Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Hillary Clinton

This post is the second in a series of blogs examining where 2016 candidates for President or Governor of North Carolina stand on key energy issues. Note: The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy does not support or oppose candidates or political parties. Links to reports, candidate websites and outside sources are provided as citizen education tools.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Donald Trump

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Donald Trump

Guest Post: 9 facts about solar in the Southeast

The Southeastern states are known to be sunny, but due to many factors, including lack of solar plans and policies, they lag behind the solar development of the Northeast. Solar communications and policy manager at the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) Alissa Jean Schafer, spoke on this “Wild West” part of the solar market at Intersolar NA 2016. Here are a few facts that summarize the information she shared in her presentation.

Southeast Green Interview: Dr. Stephen A. Smith talks Solar Wars in Florida

This interview originally ran on Southeast Green’s website and is accessible here. The Sun Shines in Florida, so Why so Little Solar? Southeast Green’s Beth Bond recently talked with Southern energy expert Stephen A. Smith, DVM who is the Executive Director of Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE). Dr. Stephen A. Smith has 30 years of experience effecting [...]

Solar For All Report Offers Solutions to Help Disadvantaged Southeastern Communities Harness the Sun

The Southern Environmental Law Center (SELC) recently released a report entitled Solar For All: What Utilities Can Do Right Now to Bring Solar Within Reach for Everyday Folks. SACE supports the report, and we are working hard with SELC and other allies to help make solar more accessible for low-to-moderate income (LMI) families across the [...]

EPA Moves Forward As Harvard Recognizes Billions of “Hidden” Clean Power Plan Benefits

Despite the setback delivered by the Supreme Court’s stay, action around the Clean Power Plan has not disappeared. Instead, the Environmental Protection Agency’s historic regulation is on the verge of another public input period and is also the focus of a recent Harvard study.

What’s more, EPA has a new proposal out and an upcoming public comment period related to the voluntary early-action piece of the Clean Power Plan, known as the Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP). After hearing from stakeholders during a previous public comment period that ended in mid-December 2015, EPA has made some significant changes to the proposed CEIP. Most importantly, EPA has expanded the range of projects eligible for CEIP participation to include solar projects implemented to serve low-income communities.

Two leading sources of dehydration team up to save water! (HINT: One’s beer.)

Some of Abita’s energy sustainability practices include a brewery process that uses 70% less energy and reuses steam, an onsite wastewater treatment system that captures renewable “bio-gas” to fuel boilers, and a solar panel system that was considered one of the largest in the state when it was installed. Because its local water resource is so pristine, Abita doesn’t need to use filters or chemicals to clean its water.

As Utilities Embrace Clean Energy, Southeast Needs Smart Policies to Promote Local Renewables Growth

Even utilities in our notoriously coal-dependent Southeast are getting in on the action. Duke Energy, one of the two biggest utilities in our region, in late April announced plans to increase its renewable energy capacity to 8,000 megawatts by 2020, up by one-third over previous targets. “We’re finding that it’s competitive” on a cost basis, Duke Energy company spokesman Randy Wheeless has said of renewables. “It makes good business sense.” The Atlanta-based Southern Company, parent company of Alabama Power, Georgia Power, Gulf Power, and Mississippi Power, intends to exceed its previously announced renewables totals for 2017 and 2018 and just bought a North Carolina company, PowerSecure, that focuses on distributed generation—smaller-scale local power often provided by renewable sources—along with energy efficiency. NextEra Energy, based in Juno, Florida and the parent of that state’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light (FPL), is a national leader in wind power development. “We continue to believe that the fundamentals for the North American renewables business have never been stronger,” NextEra Executive Vice President of Finance and CFO John Ketchum said on an April 28th earnings call.

Swamp Head Brewery Earns Green Spirit Award for Dedication to a Sustainable Florida

Swamp Head is based in Gainesville, Florida and takes its state roots seriously, calling themselves “Inherently Floridian”. They take a lot of pride in the Sunshine State and are devoted to its sunny future- their sustainability efforts have earned them a Green Spirit Award!

Remembering a champion for clean, safe energy: Michael Mariotte

This is a difficult blog post to publish given the sadness and loss we are all feeling due to the recent death of a long-time champion of clean, safe energy, Michael Mariotte, who passed away last week from pancreatic cancer. For many decades, Michael led a close ally group of ours, Nuclear Information & Resource [...]