How Clean Energy and Birds Can Coexist

Guest blog from Audubon CEO David Yarnold: Clean energy—led by solar and wind power—is expanding quickly both in the U.S. and abroad, thanks to the economic opportunities they present as well as the momentum spurred by the recent Paris Agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Renewable energy is an important way to rein in climate change and its harmful impacts on birds. At the same time, it’s crucial to choose locations for new solar farms, wind turbines, and other installations with consideration for the local habitat and wildlife.

Solar Jobs are Shining Bright

Over 35,000 new solar jobs were added in North America in 2015, bringing the total count of US solar jobs to over 208,000. This number represents a 20 percent increase from 2014, and 123 percent increase from 2010. One out of every 83 jobs created in 2015 across the whole United States was a solar job…

Solar Installations Raise Property Values, According to New Research

New research from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory recently confirmed yet another benefit of solar – It raises the real estate value of the property that it’s on.

Christmas Miracle: Congress Proposes Long-Term Support for Renewables

On Wednesday, Speaker of the House, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), introduced the “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016″. As a part of the 2,009-page bill, wind energy and solar energy will now have a long-term federal incentive. But this policy certainty isn’t a hand-out. Congress is gradually phasing-out the federal incentives for wind energy and solar power between now and 2022/2024 (respectively) – something the fossil fuel and nuclear industries aren’t guaranteed to do, too. Wind and solar power prices have become so cost competitive, market analysts expect that renewable energy resources won’t need the federal tax incentives after they expire.

Dirt cheap renewables beating fossil fuels on price

Wind energy has reached record low prices. Wind energy has reached $32-$77 per megawatt hour (MWh) without federal incentives. If the federal Production Tax Credit or Investment Tax Credit is included, wind energy pricing may be $14-$63/MWh.
Utility-scale solar power has reached record low prices. Solar power has reached $50-$70/MWh without federal incentives.

Support Clean Energy on #GivingTuesday 2015

        First Black Friday. Then Cyber Monday. Now Giving Tuesday! With one commercial holiday after another, it’s hard not to get caught up in the season of shopping, instead of the season of giving. But this year, while you’re out scouring for deals on things to purchase for your loved ones, take a moment [...]

Shop Green Friday, not Black Friday

Buy Clean Energy T-shirts this Holiday Season…& Support SACE! The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy is excited to announce that this year, there’s a couple of colorful, socially-conscious and environmentally-sustainable options you can purchase for anyone on your list. And guess what…you don’t have to wait in long lines at the mall! Shop online and [...]

Duke, Southern, and NextEra Go Big on Wind and Solar – Just not in the Southeast

Duke Energy, Southern Company, and NextEra Energy Inc. are reportedly planning to invest billions of dollars in solar and wind energy in the near future – only those investments will be outside their own Southeastern territories and will be carried out primarily by their unregulated subsidiaries. According to an article published last week by Kristi [...]

North Charleston Mayor Declares: “Support Solar” and Extend the Solar ITC

Mayor Keith Summey of North Charleston, South Carolina declared by proclamation that yesterday was “A Day To Support Solar” and called for Congress to extend the solar investment tax credit. The proclamation was read at last night’s North Charleston City Council meeting and was presented to local solar business owner, Dave McNeil of Hannah Solar [...]

Environmental Justice Community Airs Concerns in Memphis

Last weekend, the 2015 Memphis Environmental Justice Conference – Envisioning a Cleaner, Healthier Environment – brought people together, both local and national, to hear speakers talk on issues ranging from transportation issues, labor and the environment and gender and environmental security. A common theme of the conference presentations was recognition that access to clean air, clean water and even clean energy should not be restricted based on attributes like one’s race, gender, religion or economic status.