What’s Not So Peachy About Early Spring In A Warming World?

Probably like many of you, I have really enjoyed the nice weather this… winter?… spring?… this February and March nonetheless. Enjoyed it a lot. It’s allowed me to spend time outdoors much more so than usual at this time of year, getting an early start on the gardening season and new hobby of exploring the [...]

How much “backup power” is needed for solar and wind?

Answer: None. Not if the utility is planning correctly! Ok, that was a smart-aleck answer. But I’ve got a point: When people talk about a “backup,” they tend to think of a one-for-one replacement. I remember when my kids were in diapers, and I had to carry four diapers for a long day out, just [...]

What happens when the wind doesn’t blow?

It’s likely you’ve heard the argument that renewable energy is unreliable because the wind doesn’t always blow and the sun doesn’t always shine. It’s true that renewable resources are variable. We can’t make the wind blow and the sun shine 24 hours a day. That’s just nature. But, does this mean that large amounts of solar and wind can’t be incorporated into the grid?

It’s time to set the record straight.

Wind Power: Keeping the Lights On

It’s been one cold week, and grid operators have struggled to keep the juice flowing for consumers from New England all the way to the Lone Star State. In Texas, wind power helped keep the lights on when some traditional power plants unexpectedly shut down during peak load times.

How the Polar Vortex is Fueled by and a Threat to Our Energy Infrastructure

“More and more Arctic sea ice is melting during summer months. The more ice that melts, the more the Arctic Ocean warms. The ocean radiates much of that excess heat back to the atmosphere in winter, which disrupts the polar vortex. Data taken over the past decade indicate that when a lot of Arctic sea ice disappears in the summer, the vortex has a tendency to weaken over the subsequent winter, if related atmospheric conditions prevail over the northern Atlantic Ocean.”