No Bonuses for Mismanagement, Mistakes at Nuclear Expansion Projects

This blog was written by High Risk Energy Intern, Kailie Melchior. I’ve been tracking the troubled nuclear power expansion projects in South Carolina and Georgia and have some observations. With SCE&G and Santee Cooper in South Carolina, I thought utilities learned that taking big bonuses while pushing off costs from a deeply troubled new nuclear [...]

Talking Energy Reform with the SC Tea Party

On Monday of this week, I got to speak at the South Carolina Tea Party Coalition Convention in Myrtle Beach about the ongoing V.C. Summer nuclear scandal. It was a great opportunity to find common ground with the Tea Party on important energy issues here in SC, as SACE has done with Tea Party groups in other states. I was asked to talk about what’s really going on with the nuclear scandal, who’s responsible, and what comes next, so I tried to wrap all of that up into about 10 minutes, but here are the main points: 1) In trying to understand how we’ve gotten to this point with huge debt for a canceled power plant that customers may end up having to pay, the details are many but can be boiled down to that monopolies, set up by the government, have been taxing us, killing competition, and taking away our freedom; and 2)Likewise, the solutions to the mess can be terribly complicated, but it comes down to this key question: in South Carolina’s energy system, are we going to continue the failed path of corrupt monopoly control that brought us to this point, or free our state’s electric customers to enjoy customer choice in a fair power market that people can understand?

The conference had a great videographer who has made the video available on Youtube here and I’ve copied it below. If you would like to read a written copy of my remarks, please scroll down below the video.

FPL’s #PolluteAndLoot Actions Hit Customers; Lawsuit Moves Forward

One month ago the Florida Public Service Commission, the agency that regulates the state’s biggest power companies, approved FPL’s request to charge customer for the costs to clean-up an underground contamination plume caused by the cooling canal system (CSS) at its Turkey Point plant – the price tag is over $200 million. If you are [...]

Florida: Energy Winners and Losers in 2017

Happy 2018! As we would look forward to taking positive steps  towards a cleaner, smarter energy future in the Sunshine State this year, it’s instructive to look at the state energy trends from last year. Clean energy policies and projects advanced in 2017. Here’s a look at some of the energy “winners” and “losers” from [...]

What do “The Last Jedi” and Georgia actually have in common?

At the end of December, just when everyone was focused on the premier of the new Star Wars movie “The Last Jedi” (and the holiday season), the Georgia Public Service Commission ignored their own Staff’s recommendations – and that of intervenors including the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy – and unanimously voted to allow the [...]

Will Plant Vogtle Nuke Georgia Power Bills? Act Now!

This has been an intense week for the Plant Vogtle nuclear expansion project so here’s a quick blog to get you updated. SACE has been on the ground at the public hearings all week where we learned that Georgia’s Public Service Commissioners have expedited their timeline to make a decision on Georgia Power’s request to double the estimated costs for Plant Vogtle by Dec 21st, not February 2018, like originally scheduled! Georgia Power is asking to push those costs onto YOU, instead of its shareholders. With less time to flood the inboxes of the Commissioners, we really need your help!

Are industrial power customers favored too much?

Across the Southeast, industrial power customers get special perks. One reason is that they can afford to hire lawyers and experts to persist in asking for the most favorable treatment they can get. One example of this is the advance payment for Georgia Power Company’s Plant Vogtle nuclear expansion project. Georgia Power customers have already [...]

Congress: Picking energy losers, over clean energy winners

Congress just released its propose “tax reform” plan – and it’s a doozie. Instead of promoting renewable energy and electric vehicles, the plan would slash those incentives – while giving a massive bailout to the failing nuclear industry.

Two years ago, Congress passed a massive overhaul for the wind and solar industries that gave a clear path for phasing-out tax credits for those industries. The newly proposed “tax reform” plan reneges on that promise made two years ago and threatens hundreds of billions of dollars in clean, domestic, renewable energy development.

The wildly popular, and effective tax credit for electric vehicles has produced many jobs, cut pollution, and increased our energy security. But now Congress’s “tax reform” plan would totally eliminate the electric vehicle tax credit, and slams on the breaks of an American industry.

Meanwhile, Congress would extend $6 billion worth of subsidies to the failing nuclear industry.

Click here to tell Congress to support clean energy and electric vehicles.

Who Pays When FPL Pollutes and Loots?

If a multi-billion dollar monopoly utility messes-up and creates a pollution mess that costs over $200 million to clean up, should its customers have to pick up the tab? Voice your opinions to this question to the Florida Public Service Commission by this week! That’s the question before the Florida Public Service Commission this week as [...]

How Will Hurricane Harvey Affect Texas Wind Farms?

To date, no wind farm in the United States has been destroyed by a hurricane. Neither Hurricane Iselle (Hawaii, 2014), Hurricane Sandy (New Jersey, 2012), nor Hurricane Irene (Delaware, 2011) harmed wind farms. Wind farms in hurricane-prone coastal zones are frequently designed to withstand hurricane-force winds, up to level Category 3 hurricanes. For self preservation purposes, wind turbines automatically shut down when wind speeds reach excessive levels. Hurricane Harvey is slated to become a Category 3 storm, and may test the limits of turbine engineering.