Looking At The Brackets: New Nuclear Plants Are Odds-On Favorite To Lose In First Round

Dennis Wamsted’s post, “Looking at The Brackets: New Nuclear Plants Are Odds-On Favorite To Lose In First Round,” originally ran in his blog, Wamsted on Energy: News and views for thinking professionals, on March 15, 2017. Find the original post here and more about Mr. Wamsted here. Published below with permission. I just finished filling [...]

After Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, Solar Booms in the Land of the Rising Sun

Saturday, March 11, 2017 marks the 6-year anniversary of the devastating earthquake and subsequent tsunami that hit Japan and killed more than 19,000 people. The disaster also led to the triple meltdown at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear facility. It’s staggering to learn that more than 70,000 people still have not gone home since the disaster due to [...]

Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts

Dennis Wamsted’s post, “Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts,” originally ran in his blog, Wamsted on Energy: News and views for thinking professionals, on February 10, 2017. Find the original post here and more about Mr. Wamsted here. Published below with permission. Five years ago almost to [...]

We Pay for FPL’s Mess

Below is a guest column from Grant Miller with Miami’s Community Newspapers. His column originally ran on February 6, 2017 and can be found here. We Pay for FPL’s Mess In case you haven’t heard, Japan’s Toshiba is in financial free-fall and is pulling its subsidiary Westinghouse out of the nuclear construction business due to [...]

FPL’s Flawed Remediation Plan Won’t Solve Turkey Point’s Pollution Problems

Update: Since Laura’s blog post below, the Palm Beach Post’s Susan Salisbury reported on the concerns with FPL’s flawed clean-up plan in her “Protecting Your Pocketbook” blog/column. Find it here. Last week Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and Tropical Audubon Society filed an amended complaint to the Clean Water Act challenge filed this past July [...]

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: NC Governor Pat McCrory

2016 Candidate Series: Leadership from a state’s governor is critical to setting the tone for energy policies, like REPS, and this blog series aims to inform voters on the policy stances regarding energy and climate issues that face North Carolina. First we evaluate current North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory, who is running for re-election this November. Pat McCrory worked for Duke Energy for 29 years and served as Charlotte’s longest-running mayor before retiring in 2008 to run for Governor of North Carolina. Prior to his 2012 gubernatorial election, Governor McCrory also served as a champion for Americans for Prosperity, the Koch brothers-backed anti-clean energy organization.

Green Light for New Nuclear Power Continues in Georgia

On the heels of giving Georgia Power the go-ahead to explore building possibly two nuclear reactors at an undeveloped site in Stewart County along the Chattahoochee River near Columbus, today the Georgia Public Service Commission (PSC) unanimously approved an additional $160 million in expenditures for the at least 39-month delayed nuclear expansion of Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro along the Savannah River. It’s important to note that Commissioner McDonald was the sole dissenting vote on the Stewart Co. decision, responsibly mentioning concerns not only about harm to utility customers but also about negative impacts to the Chattahoochee, which is at the center of the decades long Tri-State Water War among Georgia, Florida and Alabama.

Environmental Leadership? New Study Provides Facts and Solutions for FPL’s Turkey Point Open Industrial Sewer

The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) not only identifies problems, but is also committed to advocating for solutions. One of the most significant water quality problems in the Southeast is the ongoing pollution at Florida Power and Light’s (FPL) Turkey Point cooling canal system. This open industrial sewer appears to be in direct conflict with FPL’s corporate environmental stewardship goals. And a slick PR campaign can’t cover up evidence that this system is failing and needs to be fixed.

How much solar and wind will Georgia utility regulators allow?

Our followers on social media think the answer should be “as much as possible,” but in our brief SACE argues in favor of a cap of 2,500 megawatts (MW) of renewable energy, likely to be mainly solar and wind. Georgia Power has proposed only 525 MW, and other parties have signaled interest in 1,200 MW or 2,000 MW. What’s remarkable about this “debate” is that everyone involved agrees that whatever the number, Georgia Power customers will end up saving money as these projects will cost less than the projected cost of generating power. This approach to developing renewable energy has been led by Commissioner Bubba McDonald.

Guest Post: FPL Sued Over Turkey Point Crisis By Environmental Groups In Federal Clean Water Act Lawsuit

Last week environmental groups — Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Tropical Audubon Society, and Friends of the Everglades — filed a Clean Water Act lawsuit against FPL in federal court for ongoing pollution at the Turkey Point power complex in South Florida.