Why the Pitchforks are coming out in Florida

As the Executive Director of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) for over 20 years, I pride myself and the organization in our capacity to work collaboratively with utilities and decision makers to achieve strong results. SACE has a long history working with utilities in all of our Southeastern states, and we have achieved [...]

What do all nuclear reactors under construction in the U.S. have in common?

Hint: this isn’t a hard question to answer if you look back at the nuclear power industry’s track record. And the answer is? Drum roll please… All five nuclear reactors presently under construction in the U.S. are… delayed and over budget. That’s 100%! Every single one… SCANA now joins other utilities including Tennessee Valley Authority and [...]

Money and Power: How much will Georgia Power’s reactors cost us?

This editorial by Joeff Davis in Creative Loafing Atlanta was originally published on September 25, 2014 and the direct link can be accessed here. We appreciate receiving their approval to repost this as a SACE guest blog post. Money and Power – How much will Georgia Power’s reactors cost us? Have you glanced at your [...]

For Renewable Energy, The Future is Now

Solar photovoltaics, wind energy and solar thermal technology costs have all declined pretty substantially since Lazard’s analysis last year. Natural gas and energy efficiency costs have stayed the same, although to be fair, energy efficiency’s starting low cost of $0 per megawatt of energy saved is hard to beat. Meanwhile, coal, nuclear and integrated gasification combined cycle power costs continue to increase.

Gina McCarthy, the Power Plant Carbon Standards, and Reducing the Risks of Power Outages

This is a guest post by John Rogers, senior energy analyst with the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and co-manager of the Energy and Water in a Warming World Initiative (EW3) that looks at water demands of energy production in the context of climate change. SACE is an active partner with UCS on this critical [...]

Taxpayers in the dark and at risk from Vogtle nuclear loan guarantees

SACE’s High Risk Energy Choices program director, Sara Barczak, contributed to this blog post from Whitney Rappole, 2014 graduate of Emory Law School and former Turner Environmental Law Clinic student. As a student attorney at the Turner Environmental Law Clinic at Emory University School of Law, I was given the opportunity to join the Clinic in representing [...]

Nuclear Giant Exelon Blasts Wind

The public policy position of Exelon is to oppose subsidies for wind and solar while the company itself purports to be this super-green company and also wants more subsidies for nuclear. That’s just hypocritical.

Nuclear Giant Exelon Launches Front Group to Cover Its Assets

Why is the nuclear industry in such dire straits? Mainly because of cheap natural gas and dampened electricity demand due to energy efficiency programs and a sluggish economy. The most vulnerable plants are in states with deregulated electricity markets, such as Illinois. Unlike regulated utilities, which are guaranteed an annual rate of return, these “merchant” plants sell power on the wholesale market and are being underpriced by their competition.

Thirsty Vogtle nuclear reactors would guzzle more water from the Savannah River

Southern Company’s water-hogging Plant Vogtle aims to get even thirstier if the proposed two new nuclear reactors under construction receive approval from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) for a large water withdrawal permit from the already imperiled Savannah River. The state agency is considering a permit request for up to 74 million gallons per [...]

Secret sweetheart deal for Georgia nuclear reactors puts taxpayers at risk

Earlier this week, shocking news was released regarding $6.5 billion in taxpayer-backed federal loan guarantees for two new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle in Georgia. Two partners in the project, Georgia Power (subsidiary of Southern Co.) and Oglethorpe Power, had to pay $0, zip, nothing for something known as the “credit subsidy fee” — essentially [...]