Hurricanes and Climate Change – What We Know for 2018 Season

Hurricane season officially begins today and runs through November. This is the six month period when hurricanes typically occur in the Atlantic. The beginning of the season is a good time to make sure you are prepared for hurricane impacts, should one threaten your area. But in addition to making sure our households are prepared for the short-term forecast of hurricanes this season, we must also make sure our communities are prepared for the impacts of hurricanes in the long term, by seeking to understand how hurricane risk may change in the years to come and how we can avoid the worst outcomes.

2016 Declared World’s Hottest Year on Record

Scientists reported earlier this week that 2016 was the world’s hottest year since formal record keeping began, topping the records set in 2015 and 2014, each year successively hotter than the one before it. Reported by NASA and NOAA, the news tells us that 16 hottest years in modern global history have occurred in the past […]

Engaging on Energy: Wind Power in the Southeast

Wind power is a clean, low-cost energy resource that can help reduce impacts of climate change. Wind energy also ensures clean air and water, protecting our public health and natural resources. Thanks to improved wind turbine technology, we can now collect wind resources more efficiently than before by using taller turbines with longer blades that […]

What’s the hurricane-climate change connection?

As hurricane season kicks off today along the Atlantic coast, it’s a good time to think about the connection between hurricanes and climate change. Just as we prepare for yet another hurricane season with basic emergency preparedness, we should also press for meaningful action on climate change to minimize future catastrophe.

GCAMP – Breaking barriers to offshore wind farm development for Georgia

Georgia Tech’s Center for Geographic Information Systems and Strategic Energy Institute has partnered with the Georgia DNR Coastal Resources Division to launch a new marine planning application called the Georgia Coastal and Marine Planner (GCAMP). GCAMP provides online access to data regarding coastal and ocean resources, which can help facilitate Georgia’s management of these resources in regards to offshore wind energy.

2015 Registers As 2nd Hottest Year On Record in U.S.

2015 was the second hottest year on record in the United States, according to news released yesterday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Globally Warming Oceans Are Killing Coral Reefs

The third-ever global coral bleaching event is killing coral reefs and the many creatures that rely upon them worldwide. Hot global temperatures are heating up the oceans, and are compounded by a strong El Niño pattern, causing stresses, vulnerability, and death to corals that cannot withstand the hotter temperatures. In the absence of significant mitigation […]

Charleston’s Climate Vulnerabilities Highlighted on PBS NewsHour

A segment on Thursday evening’s PBS NewsHour took a good look at Charleston, South Carolina, and its state of preparedness for sea level rise from climate change. The segment brought up a few key points worth highlighting here. 1. Sea level is rising and tidal flooding is becoming more frequent and severe. Sea level rise […]

The 15-Year Global Warming Hiatus Debunked

A new report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) affirms that the globe has indeed been warming quickly in recent decades, in spite of arguments to the contrary. In fact, the report finds that the rate of global warming over the last 15 years has been as fast as, or even faster than, the […]

11 Reasons Wind Energy Will Work for Georgia

In Savannah June 20, Georgia Public Service Commissioner Tim Echols hosted an event titled “Wind Energy, Will it Work for Georgia?” Based on the dozens of stakeholders present and expert presentations given, here are 11 reasons why wind energy will, and does, work for Georgia.