How expensive is solar power? You’re going to be SHOCKED!

In some southern states, like North Carolin and Florida, NREL reports that utility-scale solar power prices may reach a levelized cost of approximately 5 cents per kilowatt hour. Incorporating the federal investment tax credit (ITC) could drop those prices down into the 3-4 cents per kilowatt hour range ($30-$40/MWh).

Wind Energy’s Two Cents: Utilities Should Buy Now

The LBNL report tracks trends in cost and performance among other metrics for the wind energy industry nationwide. Just over 5% of all electricity generated in the country comes from wind power. The average installed price for wind energy capacity is down 24% in just five years.

Seriously, utilities, buy wind NOW (yes, this year)

Really, it is time to buy wind energy. This is very simple. Wind costs less than running natural gas power plants. Keep the power plants. Use them, we’re not saying they aren’t needed. But it is cheaper to buy power from wind projects than to run your power plant full-out. Look at this amazing forecast [...]

New Report on Wind Energy Shows Cost Reductions, Innovation

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has released its 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report. This annual report notes important achievements for the wind industry. Overall, wind turbine innovation increasingly makes wind energy development across the country a winning proposition. Wind turbine costs and the price for wind energy continues to drop.

Wind Farms Don’t Affect Property Values

“Across all model specifications, we find no statistical evidence that home prices near wind turbines were affected [...] There is no statistical evidence that homes in either the PAPC [post-announcement, pre-construction] or PC [post-construction] periods that sold near turbines (i.e., within a mile or even a half mile) did so for less than similar homes that sold between 3 and 10 away miles in the same period.”

4 Reasons Wind Power is Inevitable in the South

Last year, more wind energy capacity was installed than ever before in the United States. Wind energy was the top installed electricity resource in the country with over 13,000 megawatts added, yet none of that was here in the South. But a new report released by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory highlight the advances in wind turbine technology that make wind farm development here almost inevitable.