Will TVA Sweep Coal Ash Under the Rug?

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is hosting public meetings across its territory to hear concerns from residents about its plan to “close” some of its toxic coal ash pits. This plan practically guarantees that prolonged and continuous contamination will occur on every waterway that has one of these coal ash impoundments near it. All this in an attempt to avoid compliance with federal requirements for new coal ash landfills that establish safer practices for the long-term storage of this dangerous waste.

Honoring Black History Month and the Path Towards Energy Justice: Hollis Briggs of Wilmington, NC

Wilmington North Carolina is a small coastal town in Southeastern North Carolina. It has pristine beaches that meet the mouth of the state’s largest river system known at the Cape Fear River. This daunting name has historical significance that serves as a great metaphor for the town’s deeply rooted justice issues that many Wilmingtonians fear bringing up. But Hollis Briggs is not like most Wilmington residents.

3 Reasons Why 2015 Was the Biggest Year Ever for Coal Ash

2015 was a watershed year for our work on coal ash. It’s been over seven years since the catastrophic coal ash spill in Kingston, TN and nearly two years since the spill along the Dan River in NC. Both events brought the inherent dangers of improper storage and handling of coal ash into the public eye. In response, [...]

EPA’s Huge Water Pollution Decision and Why They Need to Get it Right

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has an enormously impactful decision to make. By the end of September 2015, EPA is set to update its 30-year-old guidelines for how much pollution states can permit power plants to dump into our water, called effluent limitation guidelines or the ELG rule. EPA could issue a weak, ineffective rule or [...]

Obama threatens to veto bill that would undermine EPA coal ash rule

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote on H.R. 1734, a dangerous bill that threatens the health and safety of communities here in the Southeast and across the country. Rep. David McKinley’s (R-WV) deceptively-named “Improving Coal Combustion Residuals Regulation Act of 2015″ actually undermines EPA’s recently published, federal minimum standards for coal ash [...]

Kingston Residents Gather and Call for New Public Hearing on Proposed Coal Ash Landfill

To read supplemental comments on the proposed landfill submitted by environmental groups Feb. 9, 2015, click here. Thursday night, February 5th, more than 30 local residents of Kingston, TN joined together at the Kingston Community Center to attend an event hosted by Statewide Organizing for Community eMpowerment (SOCM).  The purpose of the event was to [...]

Kingston Ash Landfill Changes Fraught with Concerns

December 30th marked the end of a public comment period around a draft permit for storage of coal ash waste at TVA’s Kingston plant in East Tennessee – the very location of the coal ash tragedy of six years ago. The Tennessee Department of Environmental Conservation (TDEC), who must decide to grant or deny TVA’s [...]

Decisions, Decisions at TVA’s Shawnee Coal Plant

As 2014 draws to a close, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has been busy working on making an important decision at its Shawnee coal plant in Paducah, KY.  December 9th marked the end of the public comment period for TVA’s draft Environmental Assessment (EA) to determine whether or not it should retire or retrofit two coal [...]

Something To Be Thankful For

This blog was written by SACE Communications Intern, Heather Brinton. With the start of the holidays just around the corner, let’s take a minute to reflect on the progress that has been made in the energy field since the 20th century, and let’s pause to be thankful for clean energy options that are becoming more [...]

Uniontown, AL Prepares to Demand Justice on Coal Ash

This guest post is written by Debra Mayfield and was originally published on Earthjustice’s blog on August 19, 2014. Earlier this month, Marianne Engelman Lado from the Northeast office and I travelled back to Uniontown, Alabama, a small, quiet, predominantly African American town that received over 4 million cubic yards of poisonous coal ash from the [...]