Hurricane Florence and Climate Change: What We Know

Coastal residents have watched through the last week with worry as Hurricane Florence has traversed the Atlantic, getting closer and closer to the East Coast. It is still unknown whether or not it will make landfall in the U.S., but as residents stand by to prepare for the storm, we should also talk about preparing longer term for hurricanes in a warmer world. First, it needs to be said that hurricanes are not caused by climate change. However, it’s also important to understand that the impacts of hurricanes are very much influenced by global warming. Let’s take a look at what the links are between hurricanes and climate change.

Why Florida’s west coast needs a regional approach to address sea level rise, hurricanes and more

With the Tampa area ranking as the most vulnerable metro area in the nation to damage from storm surge flooding, it’s clear that Florida’s west coast region needs to act now to make its communities more resilient. An effort is under way to bring local governments in the region together to form the Tampa Bay Regional Resiliency Coalition, allowing west coast counties and municipalities to work together toward solutions to mitigate and adapt to the changing climate, including challenges like flooding and increasingly powerful hurricanes. Read more in this excerpt from the Tampa Bay Times, written by Pinellas County Commissioner Janet Long and SACE Florida Director Susan Glickman:

Hurricanes and Climate Change in South Florida: Brainstorming Solutions

At a community gathering at Miami’s CIC, Radical Partners announced “100 Great Ideas” focused on crowdsourcing climate resilience and sustainability solutions. NASA senior scientist Dr. Timothy Hall presented the latest science on the impact of climate change on hurricanes at the event, including increasing hurricane intensity, the upper limits of hurricane strength, and how climate change affects storm surge, coastal flooding and precipitation patterns. A collaboration between the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Miami Climate Alliance, Radical Partners, The New Tropic, and ReThink Energy Florida, the event also featured a participant-driven discussion of policy and solutions.

Hurricanes and Climate Change – What We Know for 2018 Season

Hurricane season officially begins today and runs through November. This is the six month period when hurricanes typically occur in the Atlantic. The beginning of the season is a good time to make sure you are prepared for hurricane impacts, should one threaten your area. But in addition to making sure our households are prepared for the short-term forecast of hurricanes this season, we must also make sure our communities are prepared for the impacts of hurricanes in the long term, by seeking to understand how hurricane risk may change in the years to come and how we can avoid the worst outcomes.

Climate Signals and Hurricane Irma

Climate change is amplifying the damage done by hurricanes, by elevating sea levels and extending the reach of storm surge and by fueling storms with greater rainfall. Climate change may also be driving the observed trend of increasing hurricane intensity as well as the observed trend of more rapidly intensifying hurricanes. In addition there is significant evidence linking climate change to the observed shift in the track of hurricanes such as Irma toward the US coast.

Beginning of Hurricane Season Reminds Us: Prepare for Climate Disaster

Today is the first day of Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30. Last week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued their forecast for the 2017 hurricane season, which indicates that this hurricane season will most likely have above-normal or near-normal activity. In addition to this day serving as a reminder to make sure your household is prepared for a hurricane, it is also a good time to think about how climate change affects hurricanes and what we can do to mitigate the worst impacts.

What’s the hurricane-climate change connection?

As hurricane season kicks off today along the Atlantic coast, it’s a good time to think about the connection between hurricanes and climate change. Just as we prepare for yet another hurricane season with basic emergency preparedness, we should also press for meaningful action on climate change to minimize future catastrophe.

New Report: Power Infrastructure Faces Increased Vulnerability From Climate Change

“A resilient power system is flexible, responds to challenges, enables quick recoveries, and is available when we need it most. Developing resilient power resources means shifting away from relying on a centralized grid to a more decentralized system designed to meet essential grid loads, even during extreme weather events. Most importantly, a resilient approach that places efficient and clean energy technologies at the core of its solutions helps our communities prepare for a climate-impacted future while also reducing the emissions that are driving those effects.”

First in Flight North Carolina Gets First Wind Farm

While the Amazon Wind Farm US East isn’t the first wind farm in the South (as many, many news reports incorrectly stated), it certainly is the largest. In 2004, the wind development company Invenergy constructed the Buffalo Mountain wind farm near Oliver Springs, Tennessee. The Tennessee Valley Authority has purchased power from the Buffalo Mountain wind farm for over a decade. The Buffalo Mountain wind farm is made up of 13 wind turbines with a total capacity of 27 megawatts; meanwhile, the new Amazon Wind Farm US East will contain 102 wind turbines with a total capacity of 208 megawatts, with an option to add another 50 turbines (100 megawatts).

Breezy for the Big Easy: WINDPOWER 2016 heading to New Orleans

After each WINDPOWER conference, attendees are quickly reminded to save the date for next year’s event. Next year, the WINDPOWER 2016 Conference and Expo will remain in the southern region – and will be hosted in New Orleans. The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in downtown New Orleans is just steps away from the Mississippi River, the French Quarter, Cafe du Monde and other locations that represent the full New Orleans experience.