Hurricane Florence and Climate Change: What We Know

Coastal residents have watched through the last week with worry as Hurricane Florence has traversed the Atlantic, getting closer and closer to the East Coast. It is still unknown whether or not it will make landfall in the U.S., but as residents stand by to prepare for the storm, we should also talk about preparing longer term for hurricanes in a warmer world. First, it needs to be said that hurricanes are not caused by climate change. However, it’s also important to understand that the impacts of hurricanes are very much influenced by global warming. Let’s take a look at what the links are between hurricanes and climate change.

What is causing Florida’s algae crisis? 5 questions answered

This is a guest post by Dr. Karl Havens, professor at the University of Florida’s IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation, and the director of the Florida Sea Grant. This post was originally published on The Conversation here on August 10, 2018. We are publishing this piece to help explain the connections between climate change and the current algae crisis plaguing Florida. 

A mystery: Peaking power plants using more natural gas than ever in the Southeast

In 2016, there was an unusual spike in the operation of natural gas combustion turbine plants at several Southeastern utilities. At just 14 plants, fuel expenses increased by $210 million compared to recent years.

New Websites Launched To Engage Florida Solar and Climate Voters

SACE is happy to announce we have launched two websites to engage Florida voters who believe that the state needs to prioritize solar energy and climate change policy. Hot off the presses are FloridaSolarVoter.org and FloridaClimateVoter.org. The websites are intended to reach out to Floridians who care about solar or climate change and help make it easier for them to vote in this November’s election. The websites feature four main features: 1) get registered to vote; 2) sign up to vote by mail; 3) get a reminder to vote when election day approaches; and 4) resources to learn more about the voting process.

Climate Signals and Hurricane Irma

Climate change is amplifying the damage done by hurricanes, by elevating sea levels and extending the reach of storm surge and by fueling storms with greater rainfall. Climate change may also be driving the observed trend of increasing hurricane intensity as well as the observed trend of more rapidly intensifying hurricanes. In addition there is significant evidence linking climate change to the observed shift in the track of hurricanes such as Irma toward the US coast.

New Climate Movie Great Way To Inspire Action

An Inconvenient Truth, released in 2006, was the first major Hollywood film about climate change and was undoubtedly a turning point in the American story of climate action. The movie, a double Academy Award winner, was viewed by millions of people who hadn’t ever given so much thought to the topic and educated people about both the problems we face ahead with global warming, and also inspired many to begin pursing solutions. Now more than 10 years later, the team that brought us the movie is releasing a sequel, called An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, to be released nationwide next Friday, August 4. The movie is sure to be an excellent conversation starter with those new to the intricacies of this topic and diehard climate action advocates alike. The movie will be showing in dozens of cities around the Southeast (partial list below), so check here to see where the movie will be playing in a theater near you.

Massive Iceberg Calves, Reminding Us Of Ever-Increasing Temps

This week, the world witnessed the calving of an iceberg the enormity of which is rare. The Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica had a growing rift for years, that finally completed its path to the ocean and broke off a huge chunk of ice. The iceberg weighs 1 trillion tons and is roughly the size of Delaware. This event serves as a critical reminder of the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions to curb global warming.

Leaders in U.S. Economy Say “We Are Still In’ on Paris Climate Agreement

A grand total of 1,219 governors, mayors, businesses, investors, and colleges and universities from across the U.S. or with significant operations in the U.S., representing the broadest cross section of the American economy yet assembled in pursuit of climate action, today declared their intent to continue to ensure the U.S. remains a global leader in reducing carbon emissions. Together, these leaders are sending a strong signal to the international community and the 194 other parties to the Paris Agreement about the continued commitment of the U.S. to ambitious action on climate change absent leadership at the federal level. In the aggregate, the signatories are delivering concrete emissions reductions that will help meet America’s emissions pledge under the Paris Agreement.

New Executive Order Threatens US Progress on Climate Action

Given his appointment of Scott Pruitt as Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – a man with a long history of challenging health-based environmental regulations in court – President Trump’s Energy Independence Executive Order, released today, is not unexpected.

Cloaked in a patriotic narrative, President Trump’s executive order does more to threaten our nation’s energy independence than support it. Renewable energy has a critical role to play in strengthening our country’s energy independence, yet this executive order is aimed at weakening our ability to incorporate more clean energy resources into our national energy portfolio.

It also doubles down on the false claim that the coal industry can be saved by dialing back public health regulations. In truth, coal is being beaten in the free market by cheaper natural gas and cheap renewable energy.

Today’s executive order – coupled with the President’s recently proposed large budget cuts to the EPA and Department of Energy (DOE) clean energy, smart grid and storage technology research programs – makes it clear that this Administration is not serious about protecting our health, our climate or our national security.

2016 Declared World’s Hottest Year on Record

Scientists reported earlier this week that 2016 was the world’s hottest year since formal record keeping began, topping the records set in 2015 and 2014, each year successively hotter than the one before it. Reported by NASA and NOAA, the news tells us that 16 hottest years in modern global history have occurred in the past […]