Guest Post: Big Rigs, Big Benefits; How Strong Rules Will Clean Up the Road

This blog was originally published on Union of Concerned Scientists’ (UCS) blog, The Equation, by Kenneth Kimmel, president of UCS. SACE’s clean fuels team works to support UCS’ Half the Oil vision to improve air quality and cut oil use in half over the next 20 years through innovative strategies including improved vehicle efficiency and [...]

Pope Francis: Substitute Fossil Fuels with Renewable Energy

One theme throughout Laudato Si is the juxtaposition of the “tyranny over creation” (anthropocentrism) versus a cooperation and cultivation of nature. As stated by Pope Francis, “If we approach nature and the environment without this openness to awe and wonder, if we no longer speak the language of fraternity and beauty in our relationship with the world, our attitude will be that of masters, consumers, ruthless exploiters, unable to set limits on their immediate needs.” Fossil fuels including “coal, but also oil and, to a lesser degree, gas – needs to be progressively replaced without delay,” are specifically identified as forms of tyranny over creation. In essence, fossil fuels reinforce a consumerist mindset of prideful, greedy and gluttonous (yet, false) control over nature – that humanity can extract and consume fossil fuels on our own terms (some would say, “dispatchable generation”). Alternatively, Pope Francis’ call to a cooperative (fraternal) relationship with creation highlights potential solutions to fossil fuels; “Fraternal love can only be gratuitous…That is why it is possible to love our enemies. This same gratuitousness inspires us to love and accept the wind, the sun and the clouds, even though we cannot control them.” The variability (some would say “intermittency”) of renewable energy provides an opportunity for humanity to exercise temperance, diligence, patience, kindness, and humility with nature. Faithful Catholics may recognize the juxtaposition of mortal sins versus holy virtues.

Denying the climate change and health connection got them nowhere; polluters try (and fail) to convince Latinos and African Americans that the Clean Power Plan is bad for their bottom line

This post, written by Juan Declet-Barreto, originally appeared on NRDC’s Switchboard blog on June 11, 2015 and is reposted with permission. Addressing the disproportionate impacts of carbon pollution on the health of low-income and minority communities is one of the most compelling reasons for combating climate change. Many serious and rigorous scientific studies have shown that [...]

Sneak Peek at Pope Francis’ Environmental Encyclical

In 2013, the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace published Energy, Justice and Peace: A Reflection on Energy in the Current Context of Development and Environmental Protection. It wasn’t translated into English until late 2014 and must be ordered from the Vatican – it’s not an easy book to get ahold of. The Council is appointed by the pope, and its primary charge is “to engage in action-oriented studies based on both the papal and episcopal social teaching of the Church.” The Council’s work offers a credible sneak peek into Pope Francis’ upcoming encyclical. Listed below are a few major themes from the book.

Black History Month Energy Champions: Rev. Leo Woodberry Fights for Climate Justice and Energy Equity

In honor of Black History Month, SACE is publishing a blog series highlighting the efforts of African American leaders working to ensure that clean energy opportunities are available for all people and communities in the Southeast. This post is the third in the series; find additional posts here. Reverend Leo Woodberry has a long history as [...]

See How Climate Change Impacts Your State

SACE just released updated, state-specific fact sheets detailing the impacts that climate change is having on six Southeast states. The new fact sheets are available for Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, in PDF format and webpages. Check out the new fact sheets here! Recurring themes throughout all the states include the incidence [...]

An Urgent Call to Climate Action in the IPCC Synthesis Report

This post, authored by Ilissa Ocko, originally appeared on Climate 411, a blog by Environmental Defense Fund, on November 4, 2014. You can view the original post here. This post concludes our blog series on the IPCC’s 5th Assessment Report, the other posts of which can be found here. It was released two days late for [...]

Southeast Florida Continues Climate Leadership

Last week, the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact hosted its annual Climate Leadership Summit, to highlight the work that is being carried out by Southeast Florida communities to get ready for the impacts of climate change, like more frequent and severe coastal flooding, and also help set the agenda for work to come. The [...]

Why Are Latinos Way Ahead of the Climate Change Curve?

This blog, by scientist and Kendall Science Fellow at the Union of Concerned Scientists Roberto Mera, originally appeared on UCS’s The Equation blog on September 12, 2014. In the summer of 2009 I had a unique opportunity in my young professional career. I gave several lectures on climate change and society at various venues in [...]

2013 Año Record en Niveles de Impacto de Gases de Efecto Invernadero sobre la Atmosfera y los Océanos

La Organización Meteorológica Mundial (OMM) acaba de hacer público su “Boletín sobre Gases de Efecto Invernadero.” Según el Boletín, la concentración de dióxido de carbono, el principal culpable del calentamiento global, se elevó a 396 partes por millón el año pasado. Este incremento supuso un alza de 2,9 partes por millón entre 2012 y 2013, [...]