What does Toshiba’s financial meltdown mean for new nuclear reactor projects in U.S.?

This is first in a series of blogs about Toshiba’s financial meltdown and the implications this is having on new nuclear power plant projects. Today’s blog serves as an overview.

Coverage of the still-unfolding financial meltdown of Japanese tech-mogul Toshiba has been growing since late December when the massive financial losses were first divulged. Toshiba’s much anticipated earnings report call yesterday, which was expected to shed light on the situation, was delayed with permission from Japanese regulators until March 14. Toshiba still reported extremely bad news, much larger losses than earlier predicted and the selling-off of key Toshiba assets.

Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts

Dennis Wamsted’s post, “Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts,” originally ran in his blog, Wamsted on Energy: News and views for thinking professionals, on February 10, 2017. Find the original post here and more about Mr. Wamsted here. Published below with permission. Five years ago almost to [...]

Obama Serves Coastal Residents By Denying Seismic Permits

With just two weeks left in office, President Obama added a major piece to his environmental legacy by denying pending permits for seismic exploration for offshore oil and gas in the Atlantic. This announcement was the culmination of a years-long fight by SACE and many coastal residents and businesses to protect the coastal economy and way of life from the impacts of offshore drilling.

Delivering low-cost renewable energy to the Southeast

Wind resources from western Oklahoma and Texas – where the Clean Line and Pattern Energy transmission line projects will source wind – are being marketed at prices around $20-30 per MWh. That’s comparable to the price of operating a modern natural gas power plant, making wind not only cost-effective but a guaranteed low-cost electricity source for decades in the future.

Solar In The Southeast, Fall Update

Thanks to weak or non-existent policies, inconsistent incentives, and a myriad of other excuses, the Southeast, as a whole, has yet to live up to its high solar potential. The last several months have brought some interesting developments though, some good and some challenging. Here’s a quick overview of the key takeaways, from North to South.

Georgia Tax Exemption Can Improve Project Economics

Georgia has a number of tax exemptions that could potentially apply to solar and other electric power generation projects. One that can really impact project economics is Georgia’s tangible personal property tax exemption for manufacturers. Whether or not that exemption applies to power projects, including solar and wind projects, is a tricky question – there is no clear line for power project eligibility. As of about a year ago, Georgia stopped giving advance approval (or denial) of eligibility for the exemption. And Georgia does not give written opinions regarding eligibility.

What if Hurricane Matthew Hits Florida’s Nuclear Reactors?

A report published by the Union of Concerned Scientists evaluated the risks of flood surge on associated power plant infrastructure in southern Florida. UCS’s report states, “Although Turkey Point, a large nuclear facility along the coast, is unlikely to be flooded by a Category 3 storm, everything around it is likely to be, and damage to nearby major substations could still prompt widespread outages in the region.” Similar impacts may be expected of other power plants in the path of Hurricane Matthew.

Green Spirit Awards: SweetWater Brewery Protecting the Hooch One Sip at a Time

As summer is coming to an end, I’m already reminiscing over the best summer activity here in Georgia: floating down the Chattahoochee River. When shooting the hooch (as we like to call it), there’s only one kind of beer you should be sipping on and that’s SweetWater.

What do Alpharetta GA and Asheville NC have in common this weekend?

Turns out electric vehicles can bring people together and help save the planet! We are thrilled to announce Alpharetta’s Mayor David Belle Isle and race car driver Leilani Munter will be joining SACE and allies at two separate events this weekend. As part of National Drive Electric Week, SACE has helped to organize local events in Alpharetta, Georgia (metro Atlanta) and Asheville, North Carolina where our special guests will be in attendance to promote electric vehicles and clean energy.

National Drive Electric Week: Events coming to a town near you!

SACE staffers are getting charged up for this year’s National Drive Electric Week, held September 10-18th. We hope our supporters across the Southeast will make plans to attend these fun and informative events that promote electric vehicles. Specifically in our region, SACE has gotten invovled with Drive Electric events in Alpharetta, Georgia and Asheville, North Carolina. To learn more about these specific events, visit our Facebook pages linked below.