What does Toshiba’s financial meltdown mean for new nuclear reactor projects in U.S.?

This is first in a series of blogs about Toshiba’s financial meltdown and the implications this is having on new nuclear power plant projects. Today’s blog serves as an overview.

Coverage of the still-unfolding financial meltdown of Japanese tech-mogul Toshiba has been growing since late December when the massive financial losses were first divulged. Toshiba’s much anticipated earnings report call yesterday, which was expected to shed light on the situation, was delayed with permission from Japanese regulators until March 14. Toshiba still reported extremely bad news, much larger losses than earlier predicted and the selling-off of key Toshiba assets.

Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts

Dennis Wamsted’s post, “Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts,” originally ran in his blog, Wamsted on Energy: News and views for thinking professionals, on February 10, 2017. Find the original post here and more about Mr. Wamsted here. Published below with permission. Five years ago almost to [...]

What Is Your Electric Utility Planning for its Coal Ash?

Utilities in the southeast are already starting to “close” toxic coal ash pits. We calculated how much coal ash will be excavated and how much will be left in mostly unlined pits.

Red and Black Goes Green: 5 ways UGA is becoming more sustainable

This is the first blog in a series, where SACE staff will evaluate college and university campuses investing in clean energy and sustainable practices. To read other posts in the series, go here.   In just a few years, the University of Georgia (UGA) has made significant sustainability strides. Before I dive in, maybe it’s [...]

“Dirty Dozen” 2016 presents yet another strike against coal-fired Plant Hammond

A new report, released on November 16, explains the concerning weaknesses of Georgia’s water pollution permits. When these permits are inevitably strengthened to limit mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic discharges from Georgia Power’s power plants, it will make even less economic sense to run Plant Hammond – and Georgia’s water will be safer. The [...]

Georgia Tax Exemption Can Improve Project Economics

Georgia has a number of tax exemptions that could potentially apply to solar and other electric power generation projects. One that can really impact project economics is Georgia’s tangible personal property tax exemption for manufacturers. Whether or not that exemption applies to power projects, including solar and wind projects, is a tricky question – there is no clear line for power project eligibility. As of about a year ago, Georgia stopped giving advance approval (or denial) of eligibility for the exemption. And Georgia does not give written opinions regarding eligibility.

How are the White House’s transportation initiatives measuring up?

Three years ago, the Obama Administration outlined their goals for “Building a 21st – Century Transportation Sector” in their Climate Action Plan. The goal of the plan included increasing fuel economy standards and expanding advanced transportation technologies. We’ve come a long way in those few short years. The Administration has dramatically increased fuel economy standards for our cars, which aims to achieve a 54.5 miles per gallon (mpg) fleetwide average by 2025. Through this initiative alone, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 6 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) over the lifetimes of the vehicles sold (MY 2012-2025) will be cut, save families more than $1.7 trillion in fuel costs, and further reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Just last week, new rules to dramatically improve the fuel efficiency of heavy-duty trucks and buses and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions were also finalized.

Green Light for New Nuclear Power Continues in Georgia

On the heels of giving Georgia Power the go-ahead to explore building possibly two nuclear reactors at an undeveloped site in Stewart County along the Chattahoochee River near Columbus, today the Georgia Public Service Commission (PSC) unanimously approved an additional $160 million in expenditures for the at least 39-month delayed nuclear expansion of Plant Vogtle near Waynesboro along the Savannah River. It’s important to note that Commissioner McDonald was the sole dissenting vote on the Stewart Co. decision, responsibly mentioning concerns not only about harm to utility customers but also about negative impacts to the Chattahoochee, which is at the center of the decades long Tri-State Water War among Georgia, Florida and Alabama.

Will EPD cut Plant Washington slack – again – or finally cut it loose?

The saga of one of the last two proposed new conventional coal-fired power plants in the nation continued to approach its inevitable end this spring, as the air quality permit’s deadline to commence construction passed with no shovels in sight, and plant developer Power4Georgians (P4G) requested yet another extension.

If the state Environmental Protection Division (EPD) denies the extension, it could be the end of a long, long road that wasn’t wise to go down in the first place. And it would prevent any further waste of scarce agency resources.

Honoring Memorial Day With Energy and Climate Security

Memorial Day reminds us that those in the military serve and sacrifice everyday to keep our nation strong. We at SACE believe that the military’s work to address the effects of climate change and to advance energy security is a critical part of that strength and we wish to highlight the important work they are doing in this area.