Looking At The Brackets: New Nuclear Plants Are Odds-On Favorite To Lose In First Round

Dennis Wamsted’s post, “Looking at The Brackets: New Nuclear Plants Are Odds-On Favorite To Lose In First Round,” originally ran in his blog, Wamsted on Energy: News and views for thinking professionals, on March 15, 2017. Find the original post here and more about Mr. Wamsted here. Published below with permission. I just finished filling [...]

OKLAHOMA is kicking butt with wind power

Just over 6,600 megawatts of installed wind power capacity exists in the Sooner State – enough to meet about 25% of the state’s annual electricity needs – more than what coal provides. Oklahoma installed nearly 2,000 megawatts in 2016 alone. By the end of the year, Oklahoma became third in the nation for the most wind power installed.

Future is Bright for Women in the Solar Industry

This week Atlanta was one of 15 cities to celebrate the annual National Women in Solar Energy week. Organized by the non-profit, Women In Solar Energy (WISE), #nationWISE is a multi-city roundtable discussion that focuses on the development of women in the solar industry. Attendees in Atlanta represented a broad range of solar professions including non-profits, utilities, finance, [...]

About 200 Georgians Met with Legislators Urging Passage of Critical Coal Ash Legislation

On February 15, over 200 Georgians gathered in Atlanta for Capitol Conservation Day. They met directly with legislators to urge them to support proposed protections for Georgia’s pristine water resources.

What does Toshiba’s financial meltdown mean for new nuclear reactor projects in U.S.?

This is first in a series of blogs about Toshiba’s financial meltdown and the implications this is having on new nuclear power plant projects. Today’s blog serves as an overview.

Coverage of the still-unfolding financial meltdown of Japanese tech-mogul Toshiba has been growing since late December when the massive financial losses were first divulged. Toshiba’s much anticipated earnings report call yesterday, which was expected to shed light on the situation, was delayed with permission from Japanese regulators until March 14. Toshiba still reported extremely bad news, much larger losses than earlier predicted and the selling-off of key Toshiba assets.

Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts

Dennis Wamsted’s post, “Do You Hear That? It’s The Fat Lady Singing; Nuclear Revival Ends Almost Before It Starts,” originally ran in his blog, Wamsted on Energy: News and views for thinking professionals, on February 10, 2017. Find the original post here and more about Mr. Wamsted here. Published below with permission. Five years ago almost to [...]

What Is Your Electric Utility Planning for its Coal Ash?

Utilities in the southeast are already starting to “close” toxic coal ash pits. We calculated how much coal ash will be excavated and how much will be left in mostly unlined pits.

Red and Black Goes Green: 5 ways UGA is becoming more sustainable

This is the first blog in a series, where SACE staff will evaluate college and university campuses investing in clean energy and sustainable practices. To read other posts in the series, go here.   In just a few years, the University of Georgia (UGA) has made significant sustainability strides. Before I dive in, maybe it’s [...]

“Dirty Dozen” 2016 presents yet another strike against coal-fired Plant Hammond

A new report, released on November 16, explains the concerning weaknesses of Georgia’s water pollution permits. When these permits are inevitably strengthened to limit mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic discharges from Georgia Power’s power plants, it will make even less economic sense to run Plant Hammond – and Georgia’s water will be safer. The [...]

Georgia Tax Exemption Can Improve Project Economics

Georgia has a number of tax exemptions that could potentially apply to solar and other electric power generation projects. One that can really impact project economics is Georgia’s tangible personal property tax exemption for manufacturers. Whether or not that exemption applies to power projects, including solar and wind projects, is a tricky question – there is no clear line for power project eligibility. As of about a year ago, Georgia stopped giving advance approval (or denial) of eligibility for the exemption. And Georgia does not give written opinions regarding eligibility.