Guest Blog: A Cry for a Life Preserver

This is a guest post written by Frank Tursi, a retired journalist and current mayor pro tem for the coastal town of Swansboro, NC. The original post can be found here.   The numbers aren’t pretty. They paint a bleak picture of a drowning people. In less than 12 years, 6,500 houses along the N.C. […]

Why Florida’s west coast needs a regional approach to address sea level rise, hurricanes and more

With the Tampa area ranking as the most vulnerable metro area in the nation to damage from storm surge flooding, it’s clear that Florida’s west coast region needs to act now to make its communities more resilient. An effort is under way to bring local governments in the region together to form the Tampa Bay Regional Resiliency Coalition, allowing west coast counties and municipalities to work together toward solutions to mitigate and adapt to the changing climate, including challenges like flooding and increasingly powerful hurricanes. Read more in this excerpt from the Tampa Bay Times, written by Pinellas County Commissioner Janet Long and SACE Florida Director Susan Glickman:

Hurricanes and Climate Change – What We Know for 2018 Season

Hurricane season officially begins today and runs through November. This is the six month period when hurricanes typically occur in the Atlantic. The beginning of the season is a good time to make sure you are prepared for hurricane impacts, should one threaten your area. But in addition to making sure our households are prepared for the short-term forecast of hurricanes this season, we must also make sure our communities are prepared for the impacts of hurricanes in the long term, by seeking to understand how hurricane risk may change in the years to come and how we can avoid the worst outcomes.

BREAKING NEWS: Waterkeeper Alliance and Upper Neuse Riverkeeper Respond to Duke Energy Cooling Pond Dam Breach of Quaker Neck Lake in Flooding Aftermath of Hurricane Matthew

Today, Waterkeeper Alliance and Upper Neuse Riverkeeper are responding to and documenting the breach of a 1.2-billion-gallon cooling pond dam at Duke Energy’s H.F. Lee plant. The breach occurred just minutes after Duke Energy issued a statement claiming that the “Ash basin and cooling pond dams across the state continue to operate safely; in fact, we’ve been pleased with their good performance during the historic flooding Hurricane Matthew brought to eastern North Carolina.”

What if Hurricane Matthew Hits Florida’s Nuclear Reactors?

A report published by the Union of Concerned Scientists evaluated the risks of flood surge on associated power plant infrastructure in southern Florida. UCS’s report states, “Although Turkey Point, a large nuclear facility along the coast, is unlikely to be flooded by a Category 3 storm, everything around it is likely to be, and damage to nearby major substations could still prompt widespread outages in the region.” Similar impacts may be expected of other power plants in the path of Hurricane Matthew.

Climate Change, Zika Virus, TVA and Clean Line Windpower , Dr. Stephen A. Smith

Below are the public comments given by Southern Alliance for Clean Energy’s Executive Director, Dr. Stephen A. Smith. These comments were delivered to the Tennessee Valley Authorities Board of Directors during a public meeting held August 25, 2016.

New Report: Power Infrastructure Faces Increased Vulnerability From Climate Change

“A resilient power system is flexible, responds to challenges, enables quick recoveries, and is available when we need it most. Developing resilient power resources means shifting away from relying on a centralized grid to a more decentralized system designed to meet essential grid loads, even during extreme weather events. Most importantly, a resilient approach that places efficient and clean energy technologies at the core of its solutions helps our communities prepare for a climate-impacted future while also reducing the emissions that are driving those effects.”

SC Mayor’s Perspective on Flood: One Time Event? Or Wake Up Call?

This guest post, by Billy Keyserling, Mayor of Beaufort, SC, originally appeared in his October 9 newsletter. SACE applauds Mayor Keyserling and the Beaufort/Port Royal Sea Level Rise Task Force for the important initial steps they are taking to plan for the reality of climate change impacts. It appears the stars were aligned to create […]

Climate Change is Risky for Business in the Southeast

If we continue on our current greenhouse gas emissions pathway, the Southeastern U.S. and Texas will likely experience significant drops in agricultural yield and labor productivity, along with increased sea level rise, higher energy demand, and rising mortality rates. In particular, the region’s agricultural sector will be negatively influenced by the changing climatic conditions, with several commodity crops likely to face severe yield declines. Meanwhile, residents and businesses will likely be affected by higher heat-related mortality, increased electricity demand and energy costs, and declines in labor productivity, threatening the manufacturing base that is increasingly driving the regional economy. And in some cities, such as Miami and New Orleans, sea level rise will put significant amounts of existing coastal property at risk.

Charleston’s Climate Vulnerabilities Highlighted on PBS NewsHour

A segment on Thursday evening’s PBS NewsHour took a good look at Charleston, South Carolina, and its state of preparedness for sea level rise from climate change. The segment brought up a few key points worth highlighting here. 1. Sea level is rising and tidal flooding is becoming more frequent and severe. Sea level rise […]