Harvey, Irma, Jose and the shocks and hazards of place

This blog was originally posted here by Mary Babic at Oxfam America on September 8, 2017. Oxfam worked with the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute (HVRI) to develop a series of Social Vulnerability maps for the southeastern states in the US. These maps measure and illustrate the convergence of social vulnerability factors (such as economic standing and age, among others) and four environmental hazards: flooding, hurricane force winds, sea-level rise, and drought.

Climate Signals and Hurricane Irma

Climate change is amplifying the damage done by hurricanes, by elevating sea levels and extending the reach of storm surge and by fueling storms with greater rainfall. Climate change may also be driving the observed trend of increasing hurricane intensity as well as the observed trend of more rapidly intensifying hurricanes. In addition there is significant evidence linking climate change to the observed shift in the track of hurricanes such as Irma toward the US coast.

New Climate Movie Great Way To Inspire Action

An Inconvenient Truth, released in 2006, was the first major Hollywood film about climate change and was undoubtedly a turning point in the American story of climate action. The movie, a double Academy Award winner, was viewed by millions of people who hadn’t ever given so much thought to the topic and educated people about both the problems we face ahead with global warming, and also inspired many to begin pursing solutions. Now more than 10 years later, the team that brought us the movie is releasing a sequel, called An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, to be released nationwide next Friday, August 4. The movie is sure to be an excellent conversation starter with those new to the intricacies of this topic and diehard climate action advocates alike. The movie will be showing in dozens of cities around the Southeast (partial list below), so check here to see where the movie will be playing in a theater near you.

Beginning of Hurricane Season Reminds Us: Prepare for Climate Disaster

Today is the first day of Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30. Last week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued their forecast for the 2017 hurricane season, which indicates that this hurricane season will most likely have above-normal or near-normal activity. In addition to this day serving as a reminder to make sure your household is prepared for a hurricane, it is also a good time to think about how climate change affects hurricanes and what we can do to mitigate the worst impacts.

What’s Not So Peachy About Early Spring In A Warming World?

Probably like many of you, I have really enjoyed the nice weather this… winter?… spring?… this February and March nonetheless. Enjoyed it a lot. It’s allowed me to spend time outdoors much more so than usual at this time of year, getting an early start on the gardening season and new hobby of exploring the [...]

2016 Declared World’s Hottest Year on Record

Scientists reported earlier this week that 2016 was the world’s hottest year since formal record keeping began, topping the records set in 2015 and 2014, each year successively hotter than the one before it. Reported by NASA and NOAA, the news tells us that 16 hottest years in modern global history have occurred in the past [...]

2016 breaking records in all the wrong places

As international climate negotiations carry on in Marrakech, Morocco at COP 22 and President-Elect Trump vows to nix American involvement in such international cooperation going forward, the climate is sending clear signals about the need for President-Elect Trump to stay the course on combating climate change. Scientists are reporting that Arctic sea is being observed at levels [...]

What’s the hurricane-climate change connection?

As hurricane season kicks off today along the Atlantic coast, it’s a good time to think about the connection between hurricanes and climate change. Just as we prepare for yet another hurricane season with basic emergency preparedness, we should also press for meaningful action on climate change to minimize future catastrophe.

SC Mayor’s Perspective on Flood: One Time Event? Or Wake Up Call?

This guest post, by Billy Keyserling, Mayor of Beaufort, SC, originally appeared in his October 9 newsletter. SACE applauds Mayor Keyserling and the Beaufort/Port Royal Sea Level Rise Task Force for the important initial steps they are taking to plan for the reality of climate change impacts. It appears the stars were aligned to create [...]

Climate Change is Risky for Business in the Southeast

If we continue on our current greenhouse gas emissions pathway, the Southeastern U.S. and Texas will likely experience significant drops in agricultural yield and labor productivity, along with increased sea level rise, higher energy demand, and rising mortality rates. In particular, the region’s agricultural sector will be negatively influenced by the changing climatic conditions, with several commodity crops likely to face severe yield declines. Meanwhile, residents and businesses will likely be affected by higher heat-related mortality, increased electricity demand and energy costs, and declines in labor productivity, threatening the manufacturing base that is increasingly driving the regional economy. And in some cities, such as Miami and New Orleans, sea level rise will put significant amounts of existing coastal property at risk.