What’s Not So Peachy About Early Spring In A Warming World?

Probably like many of you, I have really enjoyed the nice weather this… winter?… spring?… this February and March nonetheless. Enjoyed it a lot. It’s allowed me to spend time outdoors much more so than usual at this time of year, getting an early start on the gardening season and new hobby of exploring the [...]

2016 Declared World’s Hottest Year on Record

Scientists reported earlier this week that 2016 was the world’s hottest year since formal record keeping began, topping the records set in 2015 and 2014, each year successively hotter than the one before it. Reported by NASA and NOAA, the news tells us that 16 hottest years in modern global history have occurred in the past [...]

2016 breaking records in all the wrong places

As international climate negotiations carry on in Marrakech, Morocco at COP 22 and President-Elect Trump vows to nix American involvement in such international cooperation going forward, the climate is sending clear signals about the need for President-Elect Trump to stay the course on combating climate change. Scientists are reporting that Arctic sea is being observed at levels [...]

What’s the hurricane-climate change connection?

As hurricane season kicks off today along the Atlantic coast, it’s a good time to think about the connection between hurricanes and climate change. Just as we prepare for yet another hurricane season with basic emergency preparedness, we should also press for meaningful action on climate change to minimize future catastrophe.

SC Mayor’s Perspective on Flood: One Time Event? Or Wake Up Call?

This guest post, by Billy Keyserling, Mayor of Beaufort, SC, originally appeared in his October 9 newsletter. SACE applauds Mayor Keyserling and the Beaufort/Port Royal Sea Level Rise Task Force for the important initial steps they are taking to plan for the reality of climate change impacts. It appears the stars were aligned to create [...]

Climate Change is Risky for Business in the Southeast

If we continue on our current greenhouse gas emissions pathway, the Southeastern U.S. and Texas will likely experience significant drops in agricultural yield and labor productivity, along with increased sea level rise, higher energy demand, and rising mortality rates. In particular, the region’s agricultural sector will be negatively influenced by the changing climatic conditions, with several commodity crops likely to face severe yield declines. Meanwhile, residents and businesses will likely be affected by higher heat-related mortality, increased electricity demand and energy costs, and declines in labor productivity, threatening the manufacturing base that is increasingly driving the regional economy. And in some cities, such as Miami and New Orleans, sea level rise will put significant amounts of existing coastal property at risk.

See How Climate Change Impacts Your State

SACE just released updated, state-specific fact sheets detailing the impacts that climate change is having on six Southeast states. The new fact sheets are available for Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, in PDF format and webpages. Check out the new fact sheets here! Recurring themes throughout all the states include the incidence [...]

Gina McCarthy, the Power Plant Carbon Standards, and Reducing the Risks of Power Outages

This is a guest post by John Rogers, senior energy analyst with the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and co-manager of the Energy and Water in a Warming World Initiative (EW3) that looks at water demands of energy production in the context of climate change. SACE is an active partner with UCS on this critical [...]

Today’s National Climate Assessment Provides the Latest on Climate Change

SACE staffer Jennifer Rennicks co-authored this blogpost. A new report, known as the National Climate Assessment, was released by the White House today, presenting the latest information on the state of climate science in the United States. The report, which holds significant findings both nationally and regionally for the Southeast, states clearly and simply: “Global [...]

Power Outages, Extreme Weather, and Climate Change: How Smart Energy Choices Will Help Keep the Lights On

On April 29, SACE’s High Risk Energy Program Director, Ulla Reeves presented on the topics covered in this blog to the first-ever Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference in Charlotte, NC.  This blog post was originally published on The Equation, the Union of Concerned Scientist’s blog on independent science and practical solutions by Steve Clemmer, UCS’ director [...]