Will TVA Sweep Coal Ash Under the Rug?

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is hosting public meetings across its territory to hear concerns from residents about its plan to “close” some of its toxic coal ash pits. This plan practically guarantees that prolonged and continuous contamination will occur on every waterway that has one of these coal ash impoundments near it. All this in an attempt to avoid compliance with federal requirements for new coal ash landfills that establish safer practices for the long-term storage of this dangerous waste.

Dear Governor McCrory: We Can Do More. We Must Do More.

Last week, in a crowded middle school auditorium in Wilmington, North Carolina, over 130 local residents and environmental advocates joined together to speak out in favor of clean energy in North Carolina. They were attending the final of three public hearings held by North Carolina’s Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to seek public comment on [...]

3 Reasons Why 2015 Was the Biggest Year Ever for Coal Ash

2015 was a watershed year for our work on coal ash. It’s been over seven years since the catastrophic coal ash spill in Kingston, TN and nearly two years since the spill along the Dan River in NC. Both events brought the inherent dangers of improper storage and handling of coal ash into the public eye. In response, [...]

SACE Testimony shows why Clean Power Plan means jobs for Tennessee

Earlier today, I testified before the Tennessee Legislature’s Government Operations Joint Committee on the importance of the Clean Power Plan and its significance for Tennessee. As you can see by the line up, I was the sole representative of the clean energy advocacy community on this panel: Paul Bailey – American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity [...]

EmPower TN Selects First-Round Energy Efficiency Projects for $33.6 Million in Funding

Thanks to proactive investment in energy efficiency, the Volunteer State is one step closer to seeing significant reductions in the utility bills paid by state-operated facilities. The Tennessee Office of Customer Focused Government recently announced the selection of the first round of funding under the EmPower TN program, which will provide $33.6 million for 33 projects. [...]

Don’t care about climate? 3 reasons to shut down this Georgia coal plant anyway

Between the climate talks about to start in Paris and the EPA hearing on aspects of the Clean Power Plan in Atlanta this week, there’s been a lot of talk about climate and carbon. But whether you think limiting carbon emissions is important or not, there are plenty of other reasons to phase out Georgia [...]

EPA Hosts Clean Power Plan Public Hearings in Atlanta

The Clean Power Plan sets emission reduction goals that each state must meet by 2030, based on that state’s historic generation and unique energy portfolio. States are given a wide range of compliance options and ample time to craft state specific compliance plans that are flexible, economically viable and protect grid reliability.

EPA will host two days of public hearings in Atlanta, as well as a few other cities across the country, to take public input on a few key parts of the Clean Power Plan – the Proposed Federal Rule and Model Training Rules and the Clean Energy Incentive Program. The official public comment period for these pieces ends on January 21, 2016, but EPA is hosting public hearings early for those who want to provide input before the deadline.

Guest Post: Polluters are Making the Same Old “Sky is Falling” Claims about the Clean Power Plan

The ink wasn’t even dry on the Clean Power Plan before some power companies filed lawsuits to challenge these historic public health protections.

One of their key complaints? How much the Clean Power Plan is allegedly going to cost.

In their court filing, these companies claimed that they’ll potentially need to spend “billions of dollars” to comply.

This tactic is nothing new, and it’s something we often hear when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issues a new regulation that will provide cleaner, healthier air for our communities and families.

But it’s almost always wrong.

In defiance of the “sky is falling” predictions, American industry innovates and figures out ways to comply with new, healthier standards at a fraction of the costs initially projected.

Extra Extra! Clean Power Plan Finally Published!

Almost 2 and a half months after the Clean Power Plan was released, it has finally become official. Today, the Clean Power Plan was published in the Federal Register, an important procedural step that not only makes the rule official but also marks the start of a period when the rule becomes subject to Congressional review under the Congressional Review Act. Additionally, the publication of the rule marks the beginning of what will likely be a slew of legal challenges from industry and historically coal-dependent states.

Guest Post: Clean Power Plan Can Boost Energy Efficiency Investments in Affordable Housing

Low-income households are disproportionately burdened by exposure to toxins in the atmosphere and the built environment. Climate change compounds these vulnerabilities when unstable weather patterns increase exposure and/or the potency of toxic chemicals in our environment. Additionally, low-income households are often forced to make housing choices in which they rely on inadequate or lower quality housing. Poor ventilation can cause homes to be drafty in winter and allow in moisture in summer that leads to mold and illness. Poor construction and inefficient appliances and energy grid connections leave families unable to safely maintain comfortable temperatures, leaving them further vulnerable to illness or potentially deadly accidents.