Where the 2018 Candidates Stand on Energy: Democratic Nominee for Florida Senator Bill Nelson

This post is the seventeenth in a series of blogs examining where the 2018 candidates for state and federal offices in the Southeast stand on key energy and climate issues. SACE staffers, George Cavros, Susan Glickman, and Alissa Schafer contributed to this post. To read the candidate profile for Florida Republican Nominee for U.S. Senate, Rick Scott, click here.  […]

Recap of South Carolina Energy Policy in 2018 Legislative Session

The 2018 legislative session in South Carolina was a historic opportunity for significant, long-lasting reform in South Carolina energy policy. Here is a recap of what was proposed and what ended up passing in the 2018 session.

Guest Post: Under new governor, what’s next for energy in North Carolina?

Guest Blog: When Democrat Roy Cooper is inaugurated as North Carolina’s next governor on Jan. 1, it will likely mean a major shakeup in agencies that regulate the state’s energy industry. While little is known about who Cooper will choose, we do know that his transition team began work shortly after election day and that they’re accepting applications.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: NC Governor Pat McCrory

2016 Candidate Series: Leadership from a state’s governor is critical to setting the tone for energy policies, like REPS, and this blog series aims to inform voters on the policy stances regarding energy and climate issues that face North Carolina. First we evaluate current North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory, who is running for re-election this November. Pat McCrory worked for Duke Energy for 29 years and served as Charlotte’s longest-running mayor before retiring in 2008 to run for Governor of North Carolina. Prior to his 2012 gubernatorial election, Governor McCrory also served as a champion for Americans for Prosperity, the Koch brothers-backed anti-clean energy organization.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Gary Johnson

This post is the fourth in a series of blogs examining where 2016 candidates for President stand on key energy and climate issues.  Note: The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy does not support or oppose candidates or political parties. Links to reports, candidate websites and outside sources are provided as citizen education tools. This post has been […]

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Jill Stein

The Green Party recently announced its 2016 presidential candidate: Dr. Jill Stein. Stein was the party’s nominee in 2012, but this year she hopes to benefit from higher levels of voter discontent in order to lead her to the White House. The Green Party has developed a “four pillar” platform based on “peace, ecology, social justice and democracy.” While this blog is not meant to be a comprehensive assessment of Dr. Jill Stein’s stance on energy issues, we hope it provides a general overview for evaluating where she may stand on issues of interest to energy-focused voters: coal, climate change, renewables, efficiency, natural gas, nuclear and drilling.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Hillary Clinton

This post is the second in a series of blogs examining where 2016 candidates for President or Governor of North Carolina stand on key energy issues. Note: The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy does not support or oppose candidates or political parties. Links to reports, candidate websites and outside sources are provided as citizen education tools.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Donald Trump

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Donald Trump

As Utilities Embrace Clean Energy, Southeast Needs Smart Policies to Promote Local Renewables Growth

Even utilities in our notoriously coal-dependent Southeast are getting in on the action. Duke Energy, one of the two biggest utilities in our region, in late April announced plans to increase its renewable energy capacity to 8,000 megawatts by 2020, up by one-third over previous targets. “We’re finding that it’s competitive” on a cost basis, Duke Energy company spokesman Randy Wheeless has said of renewables. “It makes good business sense.” The Atlanta-based Southern Company, parent company of Alabama Power, Georgia Power, Gulf Power, and Mississippi Power, intends to exceed its previously announced renewables totals for 2017 and 2018 and just bought a North Carolina company, PowerSecure, that focuses on distributed generation—smaller-scale local power often provided by renewable sources—along with energy efficiency. NextEra Energy, based in Juno, Florida and the parent of that state’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light (FPL), is a national leader in wind power development. “We continue to believe that the fundamentals for the North American renewables business have never been stronger,” NextEra Executive Vice President of Finance and CFO John Ketchum said on an April 28th earnings call.

EPA’s Clean Power Plan: A Positive Step Towards Energy Equity

With President Obama’s announcement of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan (CPP), supporters of Georgia’s low-income communities stand together under the banner of the Just Energy Circle (JEC) in applauding and supporting the regulations. JEC members are eager to work with state leaders to ensure Georgia’s implementation plan equitably balances the social, environmental and […]