Guest Blog: The King of EVs

This is a guest post written by Rudy Beharrysingh, the president of the Blue Ridge EV Club. To read the original post, click here.   I always wondered why Telsa owners never seemed too worried about range.  Previously, I had an intellectual appreciation for Tesla cars, but never owned one myself.   That changed after driving a P85 […]

Electric Vehicle Weekly News Roundup – June 1, 2018

This week’s roundup of electric vehicle (EV) news is all about technology!  While today’s EVs are inherently considered ‘high tech’, some of their features may really surprise you. For example, it’s incredible to think that for the first time ever, a fleet of vehicles, spread across the country, was able to receive updates over-the-air, enabling […]

The evolution of clean cars – an interview with a new Tesla Model 3 owner

SACE Board President, John Noel, recently bought the new Tesla Model 3. I had a chance to chat with him recently about his new purchase and discuss his thoughts on the vehicle. In case you’ve missed the headlines, the Model 3 is Tesla’s latest vehicle release and has been touted as the Tesla for everyone, […]

Leilani Munter’s Letter to NC DOT About Tesla, Free Market Economics and the Future of Electric Vehicles

I find it sad that the North Carolina Department of Transportation would even consider making it difficult for Charlotte residents to purchase an American-built, Motor Trend Car of the Year that has sourced from over 30 manufacturers in North Carolina.

Free market economics is touted by conservatives, and yet almost routinely now we are seeing legislation being introduced across the United States designed solely to block the competition that Tesla is bringing to the old guard. Has everyone forgotten that it is unconstitutional to regulate interstate commerce?

For Renewable Energy, The Future is Now

Solar photovoltaics, wind energy and solar thermal technology costs have all declined pretty substantially since Lazard’s analysis last year. Natural gas and energy efficiency costs have stayed the same, although to be fair, energy efficiency’s starting low cost of $0 per megawatt of energy saved is hard to beat. Meanwhile, coal, nuclear and integrated gasification combined cycle power costs continue to increase.