V.C. Summer and Dominion: How to Save Customers Money and Protect the Environment

South Carolina’s energy regulator–the Public Service Commission (PSC)–will be hearing a very important case in November to decide the future of the abandoned V.C. Summer nuclear project and SCE&G’s proposed merger with Dominion Energy, which will shape South Carolina’s energy future for decades. Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) has intervened in the docket with Coastal Conservation League, represented by the Southern Environmental Law Center, and we have submitted testimony from several experts showing how to save customers money, serve the public interest, and increase customer protection while investing in the reliable, low-cost clean energy future that our state’s citizens desire.

Recap of South Carolina Energy Policy in 2018 Legislative Session

The 2018 legislative session in South Carolina was a historic opportunity for significant, long-lasting reform in South Carolina energy policy. Here is a recap of what was proposed and what ended up passing in the 2018 session.

Talking Energy Reform with the SC Tea Party

On Monday of this week, I got to speak at the South Carolina Tea Party Coalition Convention in Myrtle Beach about the ongoing V.C. Summer nuclear scandal. It was a great opportunity to find common ground with the Tea Party on important energy issues here in SC, as SACE has done with Tea Party groups in other states. I was asked to talk about what’s really going on with the nuclear scandal, who’s responsible, and what comes next, so I tried to wrap all of that up into about 10 minutes, but here are the main points: 1) In trying to understand how we’ve gotten to this point with huge debt for a canceled power plant that customers may end up having to pay, the details are many but can be boiled down to that monopolies, set up by the government, have been taxing us, killing competition, and taking away our freedom; and 2)Likewise, the solutions to the mess can be terribly complicated, but it comes down to this key question: in South Carolina’s energy system, are we going to continue the failed path of corrupt monopoly control that brought us to this point, or free our state’s electric customers to enjoy customer choice in a fair power market that people can understand?

The conference had a great videographer who has made the video available on Youtube here and I’ve copied it below. If you would like to read a written copy of my remarks, please scroll down below the video.

Energy Storage: Charging Ahead in 2018

Duke Florida plans to add 50 MW of battery storage.
Kentucky Power’s IRP has plans for adding 10 MW of battery storage by 2025.
Duke Energy in North Carolina will install a 9 MW battery system in transmission-constrained Asheville.
West Virginia’s Laurel Mountain wind farm has a co-located 32 MW / 8 MWh lithium-ion battery system.
Duke Energy’s Notrees Windpower Project in western Texas is upgrading from lead-acid batteries to a 36 MW lithium-ion system.
Southern Company is testing a 1 MW / 2 MWh lithium-ion battery system in Cedartown, Georgia.
Southern Company and Gulf Power are testing a 250 kW / 1 MWh Tesla Powerpack in Pensacola, Florida.
Chattanooga, Tennessee’s Electric Power Board (EPB) has energized a 100kW/400kWh Vanadium flow battery.
Entergy New Orleans paired its new 1 MW solar PV facility with a 500 kWh lithium-ion battery system.
Arkansas Electric Cooperative Company began evaluating battery storage in 2015 for its IRP.
Dominion Energy (Virginia) has an IRP that evaluates battery storage, and even pumped-hydro storage.

Looking At The Brackets: New Nuclear Plants Are Odds-On Favorite To Lose In First Round

Dennis Wamsted’s post, “Looking at The Brackets: New Nuclear Plants Are Odds-On Favorite To Lose In First Round,” originally ran in his blog, Wamsted on Energy: News and views for thinking professionals, on March 15, 2017. Find the original post here and more about Mr. Wamsted here. Published below with permission. I just finished filling […]

Bigger Turbines, Bigger Opportunities for Virginia

Virginia is currently home to at least six wind energy-related manufacturing facilities serving the domestic and international wind industry markets. In 2013, there were up to 500 direct and indirect jobs provided by the wind industry in Virginia. Developing land-based wind in the state could greatly add to local economic benefits and create more wind energy-related jobs.