Florida Citizens Raise Pitchforks and Torches, Protesting Utilities Gone Wild

Last Wednesday, 200 or so St. Petersburg and Tampa Bay Area residents raised their pitchforks in protest outside Duke Energy Florida’s headquarters in St. Petersburg. The protest was in response to years of Duke’s blatant disregard for customers’ interests, including gross mismanagement of the Crystal River nuclear plant and canceled Levy County nuclear plant (costing [...]

Duke Energy: This is Not Leadership

Shorter versions of this oped were originally published in North Carolina in the Charlotte Observer on February 10, 2014 (found here) and in Florida in the Tampa Bay Times on February 11, 2014 (found here). When Duke Energy merged with Progress Energy to form the largest utility company in the United States, our organization wondered [...]

2013 – a big year for Florida’s fight against the nuclear ‘tax’

Reflecting back on 2013, the work that stands out the most for me is the campaign to repeal the advanced nuclear recovery fee, or “nuclear tax.” For years, SACE has been actively involved in protecting Florida’s electric utility ratepayers from the anti-consumer legislation that has allowed Duke Energy (formerly Progress) and Florida Power and Light (FPL) to [...]

The next Solyndra? $8 billion U.S. loan guarantee for Vogtle nuclear reactors too risky

This opinion editorial was written by Ryan Alexander, president of Taxpayers for Common Sense. It was originally published by the Tampa Tribune on their website on September 11, 2013 and can be found here. Find out more about the conditional $8.3 billion federal nuclear loan guarantee for the proposed new Vogtle reactors here and a [...]

What is the news on nukes in Florida?

Over this past week, the news in Florida has been all nuclear, all the time. And another headline for this blog could be, “Another one bites the dust” as the much-touted, so-called “nuclear renaissance” continues to crumble in the state. Just last February, Duke wisely announced that they would not pursue further repairs to the [...]

So-called nuclear renaissance relapses, recovery seems unlikely

Despite much fanfare about the so-called nuclear “renaissance” over the past several years, not much has actually materialized. In fact, the last couple of weeks have proven particularly challenging to the renaissance myth, as several decisions were made to cancel proposed new reactor projects and shut down existing reactors. Let’s take a look at how [...]

Nuclear renaissance in Florida crumbles, meets economic reality

This blog was co-authored by SACE staff Sara Barczak and George Cavros. Has the so-called “nuclear renaissance” finally met economic reality? The nuclear industry recently experienced their “worst week” since the Fukushima disaster in Japan. Not only did Duke Energy scrap plans to build new reactors at their Shearon Harris site in North Carolina but [...]

EPA: Coal Plants Still #1 Source of U.S. Carbon Emissions

There’s nothing like a heaping serving of data to really drive a point home – and that’s exactly what the Environmental Protection Agency does with its most recent report of plant-by-plant emissions data.  EPA’s 2011 Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program report is loaded with emissions data from 1,594 fossil fuel plants across the nation.  The resoundingly [...]

Controversial Former Progress Energy CEO Appointed to Head TVA

Today’s appointment of former Progress Energy CEO William Johnson as the new CEO of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is raising the eyebrows of clean energy advocates across the region, including here at SACE.  Though willing to maintain  an open mind, I’m surprised that TVA’s Board would hire Mr. Johnson with his controversial past. Of [...]

Duke Energy Merger: Glimpsing a Nuclear Future for Florida

Several weeks ago, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy’s John D. Wilson wrote about the continuing drama of the Duke – Progress utility merger that reflects an ongoing struggle for the future of utilities. It has been reported that concerns about Progress Energy’s management of its nuclear fleet were a source of friction between Duke and Progress [...]