Toxic Mercury Pollution Limits Survive Major Court Challenge

This guest post was originally published by Environmental Defense Fund on its Climate 411 blog and was co-authored by Pamela Campos, EDF attorney, and Mandy Warner, EDF Climate & Air Policy Specialist.  Find the original EDF blog post here.  Some environmental threats are hard to explain. Toxic mercury is not. A dangerous neurotoxin that threatens young children, [...]

Join Hands to Protect Our Treasured Places!

For the past four years, there has been one annual worldwide grassroots event that has championed the cause of clean energy as a replacement to risky fossil fuels: Hands Across the Sand. Since 2010, Hands events have brought thousands of communities together to stand up for their most treasured places in all 50 states and [...]

Clean Coal: A Costly Chimera?

The subject of coal has been dominating news lately.  After being unregulated for decades, the Environmental Protection Agency is finally crafting regulations to limit carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants.  Currently, proposed carbon emission regulations for new power plants are open for public comment and regulations for emissions from existing power plants are due out [...]

Duke Energy: This is Not Leadership

Shorter versions of this oped were originally published in North Carolina in the Charlotte Observer on February 10, 2014 (found here) and in Florida in the Tampa Bay Times on February 11, 2014 (found here). When Duke Energy merged with Progress Energy to form the largest utility company in the United States, our organization wondered [...]

Update on How the Coal Processing Chemical Spill Continues to Disrupts Life in West Virginia

UPDATE: Ten days later, as of January 23, my mother-in-law is still not using her water.  The ban was lifted for her area about 3-4 days after my original post on January 13 (total 8-10 days), but most of the residents around her are still afraid to use the water.  The media, the Governor, the [...]

Burning Coal, Burning Cash in the Southeast

The cost of importing coal is a drain on the economies of Southeastern states, particularly in those states that rely heavily on coal-fired power.  In an updated report, “Burning Coal, Burning Cash” the Union of Concerned Scientists use updated market data to determine just how much money is leaving the Southeast to pay for coal. [...]

UCS Report: Wind Cheaper than Keeping Alabama Coal Plants Alive

Newly updated research shows that Alabama is still high on the list of states with coal plants that may be more expensive to maintain than to replace with cleaner sources, as we noted in an earlier blog. The report, an update of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Ripe for Retirement using 2012 numbers (the most [...]

Many Coal Plants in the Southeast STILL Ripe for Retirement

The Union of Concerned Scientists(UCS) recently released an update to their existing report that identifies many coal units in the Southeast as “Ripe for Retirement.”   UCS re-analyzed the economics of operating coal units compared to the costs of other forms of generation using more recent 2011 data, updating a November 2012 UCS report.  UCS’ new findings are [...]

Alabama Coal Association Whines About Losing in the Free Market

In a letter dated December 9th to Senator Richard Shelby, the Alabama Coal Association has called for an investigation of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and other environmental groups, complaining that we have taken money from private philanthropic foundations and calling for Congress to investigate SACE’s use of federal funds in an attempt to “kill [...]

Five years since Kingston: Cane Run, Kentucky still waiting for solutions

Two weeks from now marks the fifth anniversary of the Kingston coal ash spill, one of the worst environmental disasters in American history. In the weeks leading up to the anniversary, we are posting a series of blogs highlighting communities throughout the Southeast impacted by  coal ash and its detrimental effects. The rest of the series can be [...]