Climate Feedback: Scientists Collaborate to Sort Fact from Fiction In Media’s Coverage of Climate Change

The following guest post is from Climate Feedback, a global network of scientists who analyze and critique articles about climate change in the mainstream media, holding publications accountable for accurately reporting on the issue. Last year was the hottest year in human history, and last week we learned that the Great Barrier Reef is already [...]

How Clean Energy and Birds Can Coexist

Guest blog from Audubon CEO David Yarnold: Clean energy—led by solar and wind power—is expanding quickly both in the U.S. and abroad, thanks to the economic opportunities they present as well as the momentum spurred by the recent Paris Agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Renewable energy is an important way to rein in climate change and its harmful impacts on birds. At the same time, it’s crucial to choose locations for new solar farms, wind turbines, and other installations with consideration for the local habitat and wildlife.

2015 Registers As 2nd Hottest Year On Record in U.S.

2015 was the second hottest year on record in the United States, according to news released yesterday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Fool’s Gold? Nuclear Power and Climate Change

Below is a guest blog post with permission to re-post from Gregory Jaczko, former U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Chairman and Commissioner, originally published in the Huffington Post’s “The Blog” on December 14, 2015, which can be found here. Back in 2012, then-Chairman Jaczko was the only NRC Commissioner who voted against issuing the combined operating [...]

New Report: Power Infrastructure Faces Increased Vulnerability From Climate Change

“A resilient power system is flexible, responds to challenges, enables quick recoveries, and is available when we need it most. Developing resilient power resources means shifting away from relying on a centralized grid to a more decentralized system designed to meet essential grid loads, even during extreme weather events. Most importantly, a resilient approach that places efficient and clean energy technologies at the core of its solutions helps our communities prepare for a climate-impacted future while also reducing the emissions that are driving those effects.”

Pope Francis’ Historic Visit to the U.S. Will Be a Climate Game-Changer

 This is a guest post by Ted Glick, who has devoted 42 years of his life to the progressive social change movement. The original post can be viewed here. Just in time, hopefully, the leader the world needs on the climate crisis has stepped forward: Pope Francis. What other person known worldwide, with an international following [...]

Climate Change is Risky for Business in the Southeast

Yesterday, a new report was released from the Risky Business Project about the economic threats to the Southeastern U.S. posed by climate change. The report, titled, Come Heat and High Water, highlights that the current economic boom enjoyed by the Southeast is jeopardized by impacts of climate change, and that in order to continue our gains in [...]

Can we talk? Here’s the conversation African Americans need to have about climate change

This guest post, by Danielle Hilton and Seandra Pope, was originally published on Grist on July 8. You can see the original post here. Last year, the African-American author and commentator Charles D. Ellison asked, “Where’s the Black political conversation on climate change?” Now that conversation is happening, but it’s not the one we need. [...]

Charleston’s Climate Vulnerabilities Highlighted on PBS NewsHour

A segment on Thursday evening’s PBS NewsHour took a good look at Charleston, South Carolina, and its state of preparedness for sea level rise from climate change. The segment brought up a few key points worth highlighting here. 1. Sea level is rising and tidal flooding is becoming more frequent and severe. Sea level rise [...]

Pope Francis: Substitute Fossil Fuels with Renewable Energy

One theme throughout Laudato Si is the juxtaposition of the “tyranny over creation” (anthropocentrism) versus a cooperation and cultivation of nature. As stated by Pope Francis, “If we approach nature and the environment without this openness to awe and wonder, if we no longer speak the language of fraternity and beauty in our relationship with the world, our attitude will be that of masters, consumers, ruthless exploiters, unable to set limits on their immediate needs.” Fossil fuels including “coal, but also oil and, to a lesser degree, gas – needs to be progressively replaced without delay,” are specifically identified as forms of tyranny over creation. In essence, fossil fuels reinforce a consumerist mindset of prideful, greedy and gluttonous (yet, false) control over nature – that humanity can extract and consume fossil fuels on our own terms (some would say, “dispatchable generation”). Alternatively, Pope Francis’ call to a cooperative (fraternal) relationship with creation highlights potential solutions to fossil fuels; “Fraternal love can only be gratuitous…That is why it is possible to love our enemies. This same gratuitousness inspires us to love and accept the wind, the sun and the clouds, even though we cannot control them.” The variability (some would say “intermittency”) of renewable energy provides an opportunity for humanity to exercise temperance, diligence, patience, kindness, and humility with nature. Faithful Catholics may recognize the juxtaposition of mortal sins versus holy virtues.