Hurricane Florence and Climate Change: What We Know

Coastal residents have watched through the last week with worry as Hurricane Florence has traversed the Atlantic, getting closer and closer to the East Coast. It is still unknown whether or not it will make landfall in the U.S., but as residents stand by to prepare for the storm, we should also talk about preparing longer term for hurricanes in a warmer world. First, it needs to be said that hurricanes are not caused by climate change. However, it’s also important to understand that the impacts of hurricanes are very much influenced by global warming. Let’s take a look at what the links are between hurricanes and climate change.

New Report: Power Infrastructure Faces Increased Vulnerability From Climate Change

“A resilient power system is flexible, responds to challenges, enables quick recoveries, and is available when we need it most. Developing resilient power resources means shifting away from relying on a centralized grid to a more decentralized system designed to meet essential grid loads, even during extreme weather events. Most importantly, a resilient approach that places efficient and clean energy technologies at the core of its solutions helps our communities prepare for a climate-impacted future while also reducing the emissions that are driving those effects.”

SC Mayor’s Perspective on Flood: One Time Event? Or Wake Up Call?

This guest post, by Billy Keyserling, Mayor of Beaufort, SC, originally appeared in his October 9 newsletter. SACE applauds Mayor Keyserling and the Beaufort/Port Royal Sea Level Rise Task Force for the important initial steps they are taking to plan for the reality of climate change impacts. It appears the stars were aligned to create […]

Climate Change is Risky for Business in the Southeast

If we continue on our current greenhouse gas emissions pathway, the Southeastern U.S. and Texas will likely experience significant drops in agricultural yield and labor productivity, along with increased sea level rise, higher energy demand, and rising mortality rates. In particular, the region’s agricultural sector will be negatively influenced by the changing climatic conditions, with several commodity crops likely to face severe yield declines. Meanwhile, residents and businesses will likely be affected by higher heat-related mortality, increased electricity demand and energy costs, and declines in labor productivity, threatening the manufacturing base that is increasingly driving the regional economy. And in some cities, such as Miami and New Orleans, sea level rise will put significant amounts of existing coastal property at risk.

Charleston’s Climate Vulnerabilities Highlighted on PBS NewsHour

A segment on Thursday evening’s PBS NewsHour took a good look at Charleston, South Carolina, and its state of preparedness for sea level rise from climate change. The segment brought up a few key points worth highlighting here. 1. Sea level is rising and tidal flooding is becoming more frequent and severe. Sea level rise […]

Cool It: 8 Tips to Handle the Dog Days of Summer in a Warming Climate

This guest post, written by NRDC Executive Director Peter Lehner, was originally published on July 1 in NRDC’s blog, Switchboard, and can be viewed here. As much as I’m looking forward to the long July 4th weekend, there are some things about this season I don’t enjoy: the excessive heat, the smog, the bugs—and sometimes […]

New Round of IPCC Reports Keep the Climate Drum Beating

The latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) came out this month on the impacts of climate change, how to adapt to those impacts, and how we must reduce greenhouse gas pollution. These two reports compliment the IPCC’s report last fall on the latest physical science of climate change. All three reports, respectively […]