New Websites Launched To Engage Florida Solar and Climate Voters

SACE is happy to announce we have launched two websites to engage Florida voters who believe that the state needs to prioritize solar energy and climate change policy. Hot off the presses are FloridaSolarVoter.org and FloridaClimateVoter.org. The websites are intended to reach out to Floridians who care about solar or climate change and help make it easier for them to vote in this November’s election. The websites feature four main features: 1) get registered to vote; 2) sign up to vote by mail; 3) get a reminder to vote when election day approaches; and 4) resources to learn more about the voting process.

Hurricanes and Climate Change in South Florida: Brainstorming Solutions

At a community gathering at Miami’s CIC, Radical Partners announced “100 Great Ideas” focused on crowdsourcing climate resilience and sustainability solutions. NASA senior scientist Dr. Timothy Hall presented the latest science on the impact of climate change on hurricanes at the event, including increasing hurricane intensity, the upper limits of hurricane strength, and how climate change affects storm surge, coastal flooding and precipitation patterns. A collaboration between the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Miami Climate Alliance, Radical Partners, The New Tropic, and ReThink Energy Florida, the event also featured a participant-driven discussion of policy and solutions.

Joining Hands in Support of Clean Energy

Dory Larsen, SACE’s Electric Vehicle Program Associate, contributed to this blog.   As a part of a growing global movement to protest offshore drilling, deep water drilling and offshore seismic testing, SACE participated in Hands Across the Sand events across the Southeast last Saturday, May 19. In Florida, thousands joined hands to say no to offshore […]

Can Southern Company really eliminate its carbon pollution?

Southern Company’s CEO Tom Fanning made a bold statement yesterday, announcing that the company he leads is now working to “take down carbon emissions to zero.” Speaking at the Bloomberg Global Energy Summit in New York City, Fanning provided limited details but said that Southern Company will use “technology solutions” to achieve “low to no carbon” by 2050.

Guest Blog: Everyday Climate Vulnerability in Places like Memphis

This is a guest blog written by Shelley Poticha with NRDC. To read the original post, click here. Big storms like Harvey in Houston and Katrina in New Orleans garner weeks of headlines. But each American city has a climate story to tell—one that affects people every day and that can be just as devastating […]

Walk Like An Egyptian: What Climate Change Studies of Ancient Egypt May Teach Us Today

The study of ancient history provides many examples of how civilizations around the world rose and then fell due to a wide range of factors: famine, warfare, geological catastrophe, or disease. Archeologists have previously unearthed evidence of environmental changes suddenly wiping out a civilization, such as the 300-year drought that decimated the Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia […]

Winter is coming! Which prediction should you trust?

In the battle of the winter weather predictions, what a great showdown we have in store this year! The “timeless” Farmers’ Almanac says, “the Southeast will see below normal winter temperatures with an unseasonable chill reaching as far south as the Gulf Coast, with above-average precipitation.” According to Mother Nature Network, its prediction is based on […]

Trump Admin Begins Rollback of Clean Power Plan

Following through on a campaign promise, the Trump administration signed a rule this week to repeal the Clean Power Plan, the first-ever national limit on carbon pollution from existing power plants. An historic public health regulation, which wasn’t scheduled to begin implementation until 2022, the Clean Power Plan was projected to save Americans $12 billion to $34 billion in health cost savings.

By setting modest carbon reduction goals and providing maximum compliance flexibility, including carbon reductions achieved through increased use of natural gas and nuclear, the Clean Power Plan established a balance of environmental and economic development goals. In fact, the rule would have provided relief in the form of utility bill savings, with an estimated $7/month savings realized by 2030 thanks to reduction in power demand thanks to increased energy efficiency.

Harvey, Irma, Jose and the shocks and hazards of place

This blog was originally posted here by Mary Babic at Oxfam America on September 8, 2017. Oxfam worked with the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute (HVRI) to develop a series of Social Vulnerability maps for the southeastern states in the US. These maps measure and illustrate the convergence of social vulnerability factors (such as economic standing and age, among others) and four environmental hazards: flooding, hurricane force winds, sea-level rise, and drought.

Climate Signals and Hurricane Irma

Climate change is amplifying the damage done by hurricanes, by elevating sea levels and extending the reach of storm surge and by fueling storms with greater rainfall. Climate change may also be driving the observed trend of increasing hurricane intensity as well as the observed trend of more rapidly intensifying hurricanes. In addition there is significant evidence linking climate change to the observed shift in the track of hurricanes such as Irma toward the US coast.