People’s Climate Movement Marches Forward on April 29

On April 29, people all over the country will rise up to demonstrate the political will for serious action on climate change. There will be a major march in Washington, D.C. to show that regardless of political rhetoric, the majority of Americans favor fact-based action over denial. Dozens of sister marches will take place all over the Southeast for those who cannot make it to D.C. Please plan to attend your local event or hop on one of the many buses heading to D.C.–more information is below on all of these. Together, we will show our strength in numbers and demand accountability from our elected leaders.

Standing up for Coastal Environment & Culture

Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation, is a champion of the environment, standing up to protect the natural resources that have sustained Gullah/Geechee people for generations. Just as Queen Quet stands up to preserve the natural resources that have sustained Gullah/Geechee people for generations, so too does she stand up for other aspects of the cultural heritage, which face challenges from many other economic, political, and social factors. To this end, Queen Quet is hosting the Gullah/Geechee Nation International Music & Movement Festival this weekend (August 5-7) which will showcase Gullah/Geechee arts, music, and cuisine to celebrate and share the culture.

Green Spirit Awards: North Charleston, SC Brewery Wants to Save Paradise, Says “No Drill, No Spill” to Offshore Drilling

Holy City Brewing Company in North Charleston, South Carolina released a beer this month dedicated to the paradise that is our Southeast coast: Paradise Session Ale. The ale is light, sessionable (meaning very drinkable for many rounds), and would be enjoyed by a variety of people, even if each had different palates. Paradise, therefore, is crafted to be a perfect beer for enjoying while hanging out for hours with friends on the beach and enjoying the coast we are blessed with. It is this picture of quintessential coastal life that motivated Holy City to make a statement with Paradise Ale: “Help save paradise. No drill, no spill. It’s not worth the risk.”

South Carolina Offshore Wind Energy Reaches Major Milestone

Yesterday, South Carolina reached a major milestone in advancing potential offshore wind energy development in years to come. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the federal regulator that oversees offshore wind development, announced plans to publish two major documents that close in on eventual offshore wind leasing. The two documents are a Notice of [...]

New Report: Power Infrastructure Faces Increased Vulnerability From Climate Change

“A resilient power system is flexible, responds to challenges, enables quick recoveries, and is available when we need it most. Developing resilient power resources means shifting away from relying on a centralized grid to a more decentralized system designed to meet essential grid loads, even during extreme weather events. Most importantly, a resilient approach that places efficient and clean energy technologies at the core of its solutions helps our communities prepare for a climate-impacted future while also reducing the emissions that are driving those effects.”

South Carolina Citizens Say No Offshore Drilling

An overflow crowd of more than 300 coastal South Carolinian citizens gathered at Patriot’s Point in Mt. Pleasant on Tuesday night to stand up to protect the coast from offshore drilling. The event served as the official launch of a new grassroots citizens group, called Don’t Drill SC-Lowcountry. Don’t Drill SC-Lowcountry describes themselves as “a [...]

Climate Change is Risky for Business in the Southeast

If we continue on our current greenhouse gas emissions pathway, the Southeastern U.S. and Texas will likely experience significant drops in agricultural yield and labor productivity, along with increased sea level rise, higher energy demand, and rising mortality rates. In particular, the region’s agricultural sector will be negatively influenced by the changing climatic conditions, with several commodity crops likely to face severe yield declines. Meanwhile, residents and businesses will likely be affected by higher heat-related mortality, increased electricity demand and energy costs, and declines in labor productivity, threatening the manufacturing base that is increasingly driving the regional economy. And in some cities, such as Miami and New Orleans, sea level rise will put significant amounts of existing coastal property at risk.

Charleston’s Climate Vulnerabilities Highlighted on PBS NewsHour

A segment on Thursday evening’s PBS NewsHour took a good look at Charleston, South Carolina, and its state of preparedness for sea level rise from climate change. The segment brought up a few key points worth highlighting here. 1. Sea level is rising and tidal flooding is becoming more frequent and severe. Sea level rise [...]

In Memory of a Creation Care Champion: SACE Mourns the Loss of Sen. Clementa Pinckney

The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy offers our condolences to all those affected by the tragic massacre at Charleston, South Carolina’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church on Wednesday night. One person killed that night was Reverend and State Senator Clementa Pinckney who worked with the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy in 2006 to produce the South [...]

Wave of South Carolina Communities Opposes Offshore Drilling

Last night, two more South Carolina bodies of government–the City of Columbia and Charleston County–went on the record against offshore drilling and seismic testing by passing resolutions of opposition. Both Councils passed the resolutions unanimously. The Town of McClellanville passed a similar resolution Monday night. The passage of this week’s resolutions is a trend confirming how [...]