Guest Blog: Entering the World of Electric Vehicles

This is a guest post written by Samantha Beharrysingh, who is an active member of the Blue Ridge EV Club. To view the original post, click here. My introduction into the world of EVs started when my husband purchased a Nissan Leaf in 2013. Although we had been driving hybrid vehicles for several years, I knew very little about purely electric vehicles. I was excited about his purchase, although I never drove the car.

EPA Moves Forward As Harvard Recognizes Billions of “Hidden” Clean Power Plan Benefits

Despite the setback delivered by the Supreme Court’s stay, action around the Clean Power Plan has not disappeared. Instead, the Environmental Protection Agency’s historic regulation is on the verge of another public input period and is also the focus of a recent Harvard study.

What’s more, EPA has a new proposal out and an upcoming public comment period related to the voluntary early-action piece of the Clean Power Plan, known as the Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP). After hearing from stakeholders during a previous public comment period that ended in mid-December 2015, EPA has made some significant changes to the proposed CEIP. Most importantly, EPA has expanded the range of projects eligible for CEIP participation to include solar projects implemented to serve low-income communities.

Clean Power Plan Hits Speed Bump in Unprecedented Move by Supreme Court

In today’s world of heightened political theatre, it’s hard to be surprised anymore. Yesterday, however, the Supreme Court surprised many by agreeing to stay implementation of the Clean Power Plan before the review by the federal appeals court on the merits of the case.

The Supreme Court’s decision comes after a January 21st decision by the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals to deny the request for a stay by the coal industry and coal-dependent states. What’s most surprising is that the Supreme Court has never before halted implementation and compliance efforts for a regulation that is still awaiting review by a federal appeals court. Ultimately, the movement towards creating a cleaner electric generating sector will continue as utilities respond to market realities and customer demand for cheaper, cleaner energy sources.

Guest Post: Polluters are Making the Same Old “Sky is Falling” Claims about the Clean Power Plan

The ink wasn’t even dry on the Clean Power Plan before some power companies filed lawsuits to challenge these historic public health protections.

One of their key complaints? How much the Clean Power Plan is allegedly going to cost.

In their court filing, these companies claimed that they’ll potentially need to spend “billions of dollars” to comply.

This tactic is nothing new, and it’s something we often hear when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issues a new regulation that will provide cleaner, healthier air for our communities and families.

But it’s almost always wrong.

In defiance of the “sky is falling” predictions, American industry innovates and figures out ways to comply with new, healthier standards at a fraction of the costs initially projected.

Environmental Justice In the Clean Power Plan

Power plants are the largest source of carbon dioxide in the United States, the pollution that is throwing our climate into chaos. Power plants also emit conventional and toxic air pollutants that contribute to respiratory and heart diseases, as well as premature death. The Clean Power Plan will lead to significant climate and public health benefits for all, including minority, low-income, and indigenous communities.

Final Clean Power Plan Safeguards Public Health and Spurs Clean Energy Growth

On Monday, President Obama announced the release of the finalized Clean Power Plan, our nation’s first regulations to limit carbon pollution from existing fossil-fueled power plants. The Clean Power Plan, as crafted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets achievable carbon pollution reduction goals for each state, based on the unique energy mix currently serving the power needs of each state.

This historic action will mean a huge boon to public health. Along with reducing climate-change causing carbon pollution, the Clean Power Plan will also reduce other harmful pollution from coal plants resulting in prevention of 3,600 premature deaths, 1,700 non-fatal heart attacks, 90,000 asthma attacks in children and 300,000 missed workdays and schooldays due to illness.

6 Things Every American Should Know About the Clean Power Plan

This blogpost was written by EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and originally published on August 3rd on EPA Connect Blog here. Today, President Obama will unveil the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Clean Power Plan—a historic step to cut the carbon pollution driving climate change. Here are six key things every American should know: 1. IT SLASHES [...]

Lung Association Report: Energy Efficiency Saves Lives in Southeast States

A new report from the American Lung Association, authored by scientists from the Harvard School of Public Health, School of Public Health at Boston University, and Syracuse University, shows that limiting carbon pollution from coal plants can save lives in the Southeast. Furthermore, accomplishing those limits by investing in energy efficiency maximizes benefits for families [...]

¿Cómo me afecta la polución? Te caerías de espalda…

Escrito por Rudi Navarra, director del “Southeast Climate & Energy Network” (o en sus siglas en inglés, SCEN) La agencia nacional estadounidense que controla la polución y sus efectos dañinos en nuestras vidas cotidianas, el “Environmental Protection Agency” (EPA), ha propuesto nuevas reglas contra la emisión de la polución del carbono. ¿Qué quiere esto decir? Una [...]

Packed House at EPA’s Atlanta Hearing on Carbon Rules

 Yesterday, the Environmental Protection Agency began two days of public hearings in Atlanta to gather public input on its proposed Clean Power Plan.  Originally planned as a one-day hearing, EPA added an additional day to accommodate the overwhelming amount of requests from people wanting to weigh in on the first ever proposed carbon pollution limits [...]