Identifying Leaders: “Solar in the Southeast” Annual Report blog series (part 3 of 5)

This is part three in a five-part series about the SACE “Solar in the Southeast” 2017 Annual Report To view other blogs in this series, click here. Identifying Utility Solar Leaders and “SunRisers” A highlight of the Solar in the Southeast 2017 Annual Report was shining a light on utilities, large and small, that are moving […]

Energy efficiency is trending up and down in the Southeast

Yesterday we reported on how Duke Energy leads the Southeast in energy efficiency, and Florida Power & Light is providing the worst results in the region. But what about the rest? There are a lot of great stories to tell, but first here’s a reminder of the overview. We report on the recent performance of […]

Duke Energy leads the Southeast on energy efficiency

Duke Energy Carolinas has reached the 1% energy savings benchmark in 2016, a nationally recognized indicator of success in providing customers with energy efficiency programs. Congratulations to all the staff at Duke Energy for that achievement! Since we last reported utility energy efficiency savings in 2014, we have seen some remarkably good as well as […]

Pruitt EPA Should Deny New Utility Move to Weaken Federal Coal Ash Rule

Like last month’s stay on the water discharge rule, a potential stay on the Coal Ash Rule extends unconscionable risk for the people who live near coal ash pits, which can rupture or leak toxics into drinking water, while pandering to corporate utilities that have gotten away with dangerous waste handling for decades.

Pruitt EPA’s Water Pollution Delay Extends Uncertainty for Southeast Coal Plants

Since 1982, little has changed about the toxic pollution coal-fired power plants are allowed to dump in water, although change was on its way. Unfortunately, if EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has his way, our waterways and our health will remain threatened by our nation’s leading source of toxic water pollution – coal fired power plants. We will have to keep on waiting for modern, updated protections and coal plant operators face continued uncertainty over their compliance obligations – uncertainty that may actually accelerate coal’s decline. In early May, Environmental groups challenged the legality Administrator Pruitt’s stay.

In the Southeast, many power plants’ operators were already preparing to meet new 2015 standards, which would go into effect in 2018, updating pollution control technology at their plants and working with state agencies to update state water discharge permits. The 2015 Effluent Limitation Guidelines (ELGs), which represents the first update to these regulations since 1982, nearly eliminates dumping of ash-contaminated wastewater, and for the first time, limits the discharge of toxic heavy metals that come from removing toxics from the air pollution stream and trapping them in sludge as part of the wastewater stream.

Engaging on Energy: Corporate Social Responsibility and the Demand for Renewable Energy

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) refers to a company’s voluntary commitment to responsible business practices that benefit society. CSR accounts for the social and environmental impacts a business has in the course of its operations – a concept often referred to as the “triple bottom line.” The “triple bottom line” (TBL) describes three different “bottom lines” a company […]

OKLAHOMA is kicking butt with wind power

Just over 6,600 megawatts of installed wind power capacity exists in the Sooner State – enough to meet about 25% of the state’s annual electricity needs – more than what coal provides. Oklahoma installed nearly 2,000 megawatts in 2016 alone. By the end of the year, Oklahoma became third in the nation for the most wind power installed.

What Is Your Electric Utility Planning for its Coal Ash?

Utilities in the southeast are already starting to “close” toxic coal ash pits. We calculated how much coal ash will be excavated and how much will be left in mostly unlined pits.

Alabama PSC limits public words on energy mix… draw them a picture instead

As in years past, the Alabama Public Service Commission (PSC) severely limited discussion of Alabama Power’s choices about its mix of energy sources at the one and only opportunity for public discussion it holds each year. Now you can show and tell the people who make decisions about our energy future what sources of energy you would like to see with a new online tool. PicMyEnergyMix Alabama will send a picture of the energy mix you want straight to the Alabama PSC.

FL, GA, and AL Failing to Properly Regulate Coal Ash

Environmental regulators in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama have so far failed to strengthen state policies to at least match EPA’s federal minimum standards for coal ash handling and storage.