Duke Energy’s Commitment to Overspend on Coal Plants

Duke Energy is banking on charging customers in the Carolinas an estimated $7.7 billion just to keep its existing fleet of coal plants running. For at least thirteen of those units (at 5 plants), however, it is pretty clear that the additional investment is not worthwhile, and Duke Energy should change its plans. What’s worse, [...]

Toxic Mercury Pollution Limits Survive Major Court Challenge

This guest post was originally published by Environmental Defense Fund on its Climate 411 blog and was co-authored by Pamela Campos, EDF attorney, and Mandy Warner, EDF Climate & Air Policy Specialist.  Find the original EDF blog post here.  Some environmental threats are hard to explain. Toxic mercury is not. A dangerous neurotoxin that threatens young children, [...]

Burying the evidence and our heads: North Carolina deletes climate docs

I don’t know about you, but I’ve really found the breaking news on climate change assaulting and terrifying lately. Headlines like “Climate Change: ‘Abrupt,’ Unpredictable,’ ‘Irreversible’ and ‘Highly Damaging‘” have frequented my news feed illustrating how catastrophic the effects of climate change will be and actually already are. Just last week I saw the first [...]

Remembering TN’s Coal Ash Problems After NC’s Dan River Disaster

In the wake of the recent coal ash disaster at Duke Energy’s Dan River plant in Eden, NC, environmental groups have become increasingly concerned with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s (TDEC) handling of toxic coal ash within the state. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Tennessee’s coal ash impoundments can hold up [...]

Clean Coal: A Costly Chimera?

The subject of coal has been dominating news lately.  After being unregulated for decades, the Environmental Protection Agency is finally crafting regulations to limit carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants.  Currently, proposed carbon emission regulations for new power plants are open for public comment and regulations for emissions from existing power plants are due out [...]

Duke Energy: This is Not Leadership

Shorter versions of this oped were originally published in North Carolina in the Charlotte Observer on February 10, 2014 (found here) and in Florida in the Tampa Bay Times on February 11, 2014 (found here). When Duke Energy merged with Progress Energy to form the largest utility company in the United States, our organization wondered [...]

Shout Out: Good Carbon Reduction News from TVA

OK, I admit it; in our watchdog/clean energy advocate role, we at SACE are often critical of our regional utilities. Yet, we have and will continue to call out positive developments and give credit where credit is due for movement in the right direction. Here is a big shout out for the biggest public power [...]

Update on How the Coal Processing Chemical Spill Continues to Disrupts Life in West Virginia

UPDATE: Ten days later, as of January 23, my mother-in-law is still not using her water.  The ban was lifted for her area about 3-4 days after my original post on January 13 (total 8-10 days), but most of the residents around her are still afraid to use the water.  The media, the Governor, the [...]

Efforts to Regulate Interstate Air Pollution Move Slowly Forward

Recently we’ve seen several developments in the never ending fight for cleaner air. Along with newly proposed regulations limiting carbon emissions from new coal-fired power plants, and pending carbon emission limits for existing coal-fired power plants, federal regulation further limiting other harmful air pollutants are finding their way through various channels. The Cross State Air [...]

Burning Coal, Burning Cash in the Southeast

The cost of importing coal is a drain on the economies of Southeastern states, particularly in those states that rely heavily on coal-fired power.  In an updated report, “Burning Coal, Burning Cash” the Union of Concerned Scientists use updated market data to determine just how much money is leaving the Southeast to pay for coal. [...]