Obama Administration Denies All Pending Permits for Seismic Airgun Blasting in Atlantic Ocean

This blog post is a press statement that our ally, Oceana, issued earlier today applauding the Obama Administration’s decision to protect East Coast communities and economies by denying permits for seismic airgun blasting along our Southern coasts. To view the original statement, click here.                                                                               WASHINGTON – Today, the Obama administration [...]

Top 3 Coal Ash Stories to Follow in 2017

2017 is shaping up to be an important year for coal ash in the Southeast. Here are the three critical stories to watch.

What Is Your Electric Utility Planning for its Coal Ash?

Utilities in the southeast are already starting to “close” toxic coal ash pits. We calculated how much coal ash will be excavated and how much will be left in mostly unlined pits.

Alabama PSC limits public words on energy mix… draw them a picture instead

As in years past, the Alabama Public Service Commission (PSC) severely limited discussion of Alabama Power’s choices about its mix of energy sources at the one and only opportunity for public discussion it holds each year. Now you can show and tell the people who make decisions about our energy future what sources of energy you would like to see with a new online tool. PicMyEnergyMix Alabama will send a picture of the energy mix you want straight to the Alabama PSC.

Coal ash protesters arrested in Puerto Rico

Dozens of residents of Peñuelas, Puerto Rico and their supporters were arrested today [November 23] for protests against the trucking of AES Puerto Rico, L.P. coal ash waste to the Peñuelas Valley Landfill.

“Dirty Dozen” 2016 presents yet another strike against coal-fired Plant Hammond

A new report, released on November 16, explains the concerning weaknesses of Georgia’s water pollution permits. When these permits are inevitably strengthened to limit mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic discharges from Georgia Power’s power plants, it will make even less economic sense to run Plant Hammond – and Georgia’s water will be safer. The [...]

FPL’s Flawed Remediation Plan Won’t Solve Turkey Point’s Pollution Problems

Update: Since Laura’s blog post below, the Palm Beach Post’s Susan Salisbury reported on the concerns with FPL’s flawed clean-up plan in her “Protecting Your Pocketbook” blog/column. Find it here. Last week Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and Tropical Audubon Society filed an amended complaint to the Clean Water Act challenge filed this past July [...]

Guest Post: Another Duke Energy coal ash spill discovered into the Neuse River

This is a guest post from a press release by Waterkeepers Alliance.

GOLDSBORO, N.C. — Waterkeeper Alliance and Sound Rivers have discovered a large coal ash spill into the Neuse River from the Duke Energy H.F. Lee facility, 10 miles upstream of Goldsboro, NC. A substantial but undetermined amount of coal ash was found floating on the surface of the river in a layer over one inch thick. See video here.

Question and Answer: An improved tool for watchdogging coal ash in the Southeast

The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) created its informational website SoutheastCoalAsh.org in late 2012 as a resource to those wishing to learn more about the topic. Since then, the coal-ash issue’s landscape has changed many times over thanks to the 2014 Dan River spill, but especially because both the federal and state regulatory landscapes have changed. The site has been updated to include more prominent mapping of coal ash sites across the Southeast along with tracking industry’s responses to deadlines established by EPA’s coal ash rule and state rules.

BREAKING NEWS: Waterkeeper Alliance and Upper Neuse Riverkeeper Respond to Duke Energy Cooling Pond Dam Breach of Quaker Neck Lake in Flooding Aftermath of Hurricane Matthew

Today, Waterkeeper Alliance and Upper Neuse Riverkeeper are responding to and documenting the breach of a 1.2-billion-gallon cooling pond dam at Duke Energy’s H.F. Lee plant. The breach occurred just minutes after Duke Energy issued a statement claiming that the “Ash basin and cooling pond dams across the state continue to operate safely; in fact, we’ve been pleased with their good performance during the historic flooding Hurricane Matthew brought to eastern North Carolina.”