New Solar Choice Coalition Launched in Tennessee

SACE was proud to join founding members of Tennesseans for Solar Choice gathered in Nashville on November 8th, 2017 to launch a new initiative in defense of energy freedom and fair access to affordable, solar energy.

Worst to First? Lifting up Tennessee Through the Proud Voter Challenge

Angela Garrone, SACE’s Southeast Energy Research Attorney contributed to this blog post.  Here in the South, we are experiencing an extreme drought in the form of elected officials who understand the importance of clean energy for our country’s future. In just the past year, wind energy development in North Carolina is under attack, and offshore drilling and seismic blasting [...]

Boo! Should Duke Energy’s Shift from Electricity Rates to Mandatory Fees Scare Us?

Duke Energy Progress is facing a tough time with its spooky request to raise customer rates by 14 percent. North Carolina’s customer advocate has come out strongly against the 14 percent rate hike, and thousands of Duke Energy Progress customers have attended public hearings or signed a petition against allowing Duke Energy to increase electric [...]

Guest Commentary: A time to break down, a time to build up: energy equity and the Southeast’s future

This is a guest post originally published by Southeast Energy News. To read the original article, click here. SACE’s own Amelia Shenstone was one of five “clean energy energy superheroes” awarded during the #ATL100 event for her leadership on energy efficiency throughout the Southeast.

Walking in Memphis—Just Feet Above a Coal Ash Cesspool

Memphis residents now have another reason to sing the blues. Last week, the nation’s largest public utility, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), admitted that the groundwater beneath its Allen coal-burning power plant is poisoned with astronomically high amounts of arsenic. Levels of the potent carcinogen measure nearly 400 times the federal limit for drinking water. In addition, lead in the groundwater is more than four times the standard.

A Penny Shared is a Penny Used to Lift Energy Burdens in Memphis

More often than not, Memphians rely on each other in the face of a challenge, so it’s only appropriate that now, when other options are unavailable in the short-term, Memphians are turning to each other to help lift unnecessarily high energy burdens that are contributing to an intergenerational cycle of poverty. The Share the Pennies program, which came out of a community-driven effort to find relief for burdened communities, is betting that Memphians will once again come to each other’s aid in the short-term, as we continue to fight for long-term solutions from sources outside our communities.

Interview: A Groundbreaking Plan to “Drawdown” Greenhouse Gas

What will it take to get to a point where the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere starts getting smaller? That’s the question behind a new book from Paul Hawken and Project Drawdown. The answers it provides may be surprising. Beyond renewable energy and green transportation, top climate solutions included expanding both sustainable agriculture [...]

Memphis Wins BIG in the Solar in Your Community Challenge!

Summer is just around the corner and the sun is already shining on Memphis, TN. Five Memphis teams are moving forward to the next phase of the SunShot Prize: Solar In Your Community Challenge, a Department of Energy initiative aimed at increasing opportunities and access to solar resources in lower-income communities (The State University of New York Polytechnic Institute will administer the Challenge). Memphis is prime real estate for solar projects, thanks both to geography and the long hours of sunlight we get throughout the year. Couple that with a high number of communities living in poverty and in need of cheap power – the SunShot Challenge is a perfect fit for Memphis.

People’s Climate Movement Marches Forward on April 29

On April 29, people all over the country will rise up to demonstrate the political will for serious action on climate change. There will be a major march in Washington, D.C. to show that regardless of political rhetoric, the majority of Americans favor fact-based action over denial. Dozens of sister marches will take place all over the Southeast for those who cannot make it to D.C. Please plan to attend your local event or hop on one of the many buses heading to D.C.–more information is below on all of these. Together, we will show our strength in numbers and demand accountability from our elected leaders.

Black History Month Energy Leaders Blog Series: Bishop Carroll Johnson Stands Up for Solar in the Sunshine State

n honor of Black History Month, SACE is publishing a blog series highlighting the efforts of African American leaders that have played key roles in clean energy in the Southeast.The third post in the series interviews Bishop Carroll Johnson of Orlando Florida.