Memphians Ask TVA for Energy Efficiency Solutions to Extreme Energy Burdens

This blog is the second in a series SACE is publishing on recent energy efficiency meetings between TVA and community members all across the Tennessee Valley. The first blog, focusing on TVA customers in rural East Tennessee, can be found here.  As part of a statewide organizing effort, communities across Tennessee are meeting with Tennessee [...]

Utility-Backed Amendment 1 Blocks the Sun

Florida is the Sunshine State, right? But you wouldn’t know it by looking at Florida rooftops. There are 9 million electricity customers, yet less than 12,000 solar rooftop systems. Even though Florida is one of the largest electricity markets in the country, it ranked 17th in solar development last year. So, the state shouldn’t be [...]

Sparks Fly at FPL Rate Hike Public Hearings

You would think that $1.65 billion dollars would be enough profit for Florida Power and Light (FPL) – Florida’s biggest power company. Yet, it recently proposed a 24% rate hike on customers that includes a request for an additional $240 million dollars in pure profit. A series of public hearings on the FPL rate hike recently concluded in south Florida – and sparks flew.

Just Energy Memphis Coalition Works to Ease Energy Burden

This Earth Day, we take a moment to recognize that clean energy solutions can not only help save our planet from the devastation of extreme climate change, but also help save families from suffering due to high energy costs. Just this week, Memphis, TN was named one of the top 10 cities with the highest energy burden in the country in a new report, with Memphians spending an average of just over 6% of their income on energy bills. This percentage more than doubles for low-income families in Memphis, with those families paying over 13% of their income on utility bills – the highest in the country! Families with high energy burdens suffer significant negative health impacts and economic hardship. They face greater risks for respiratory diseases and increased stress, and too often have to choose between putting food on the table and keeping their lights on.

EPA Administrator Talks Clean Air for Kids in Atlanta

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator, Gina McCarthy, joined moms in Atlanta last night to talk about air pollution and ways we can work together to provide cleaner air for our kids. The theme of her remarks was clear: “Keep talking.” She urged us to “keep making the case that the march to clean power [...]

Honoring Black History Month and the Path Towards Energy Justice: Creating a Climate for Change

The Clean Power Plan and the transition to the clean energy economy more broadly are creating immense opportunities for community engagement in helping shape our states’ energy futures. Environmental justice champion, Reverend Leo Woodberry, who we profiled in our Black History Month blog series last year, is therefore focusing on bringing people together to find common ground in acting on climate change.

Honoring Black History Month and the Path Towards Energy Justice: Dr. Yolanda Whyte fights for children

When it comes to keeping kids safe and healthy, SACE member Dr. Yolanda Whyte knows that it takes more than a visit to the pediatrician. She is devoted to raising the alarm about the source of many health problems, especially for children of color and those who live in low-income areas: environmental toxics in our air and water. She graciously agreed to be interviewed for SACE’s Black History Month series.

Honoring Black History Month and the Path Towards Energy Justice: Energy Efficiency and Economic Stability in Memphis

In cities as old and historic as Memphis, TN, there are often many older, inefficient homes where energy seeps out through leaky windows, doors and poorly insulated attics. A city often remembered for its role in the Civil Rights Movement, Memphis is a majority-minority city with African-Americans comprising around 63% of the population. As of 2010, almost 27% of Memphians were living in poverty – and only a little more than half of the city (51%) owned their own homes. The other half of Memphians live in multi-family housing, like apartment buildings, duplexes, and condominiums, where families have less control over the energy efficiency of their residences.

Arlicia Gilliams is one Memphian who used to live in an extremely inefficient apartment that lost energy through poorly sealed doors, windows and a poorly sealed attic. Although gainfully employed and working hard, Ms. Gilliams was struggling to meet unnecessarily high utility bills while also on the search to buy a house. Now, Ms. Gilliams is the proud owner of a new energy efficient home built by Habitat for Humanity.

Honoring Black History Month and the Path Towards Energy Justice: Coal Ash Testimony at US Commission on Civil Rights

On Feb 5 I had the honor to accompany local and national advocates to Washington, DC for a briefing of the US Commission on Civil Rights regarding the environmental justice impacts of toxic coal ash. Together, we delivered an unequivocal message to the Commission: Communities are suffering from this byproduct of burning coal for electricity, and EPA’s rules leave a lot to be desired to protect them. In 2016, the Commission is reviewing civil rights implications of EPA’s policies and will provide a report to Congress and the President by September 30. EPA recently released two new rules related to coal ash, so the Commission held this day-long briefing to hear from several panels of impacted people, experts, and industry representatives about environmental justice and coal ash.

Honoring Black History Month and the Path Towards Energy Justice: Hollis Briggs of Wilmington, NC

Wilmington North Carolina is a small coastal town in Southeastern North Carolina. It has pristine beaches that meet the mouth of the state’s largest river system known at the Cape Fear River. This daunting name has historical significance that serves as a great metaphor for the town’s deeply rooted justice issues that many Wilmingtonians fear bringing up. But Hollis Briggs is not like most Wilmington residents.