Guest Post: Under new governor, what’s next for energy in North Carolina?

Guest Blog: When Democrat Roy Cooper is inaugurated as North Carolina’s next governor on Jan. 1, it will likely mean a major shakeup in agencies that regulate the state’s energy industry. While little is known about who Cooper will choose, we do know that his transition team began work shortly after election day and that they’re accepting applications.

How the Trump Administration and Congress Should Use Science to Govern

This blog is a guest post by Peter Frumhoff of the Union of Concerned Scientists. The original post ran here on November 30, 2016.

The election of Donald Trump raises many questions about the future role of science and evidence in policy making. Many of us are deeply troubled that some transition team members, senior administration officials and people nominated to head up federal agencies have a history of attacking scientists and misrepresenting science.

Massive Rate Increase Lands FPL On Naughty List

Christmas may be 25 days away, but it came early for the state’s biggest power company, Florida Power and Light (FPL). The monopoly utility just got the top item on their wish list – a massive rate hike, which will raise profits substantially, after already raking in over $1.6 billion in profit last year.

Environmental Community Responds To DEQ Secretary’s Letter To Incoming Trump Administration

RALEIGH – A coalition of environmental advocacy groups responded to a letter sent November 16, 2016 by current NC DEQ Secretary Donald van der Vaart and others to President-Elect Donald Trump with the following joint statement…

What do the 2016 election results mean for energy efficiency?

This guest post was authored by Steven Nadel, Executive Director of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) and was originally published on ACEEE’s blog here.  Now that the hard-fought 2016 election is over, I think it is useful to consider its impact on energy efficiency policy. No doubt, a lot of uncertainty [...]

The Local Power Company of the Future?! Chattanooga’s EPB Lights the Way for Others

Imagine a world where your local power company calls you and tells you they’ve identified a potential problem with your home that is causing you to have unnecessarily high utility bills.

Imagine a representative of your local power company showing up at your front door to investigate the problem.

Imagine finding out from your power company that you have a problem with your heating and cooling system and that they are going to help fix it.

Imagine getting a lower utility bill.

Sound too good to be true? Well, the Southeast is home to a utility that is already doing this – and providing low cost internet and television service to their customers. Chattanooga Electric Power Board (EPB) is setting a new standard of service for local power companies and SACE staff recently got a peek behind the scenes to learn more about how EPB is paving the way towards a more service oriented utility.

Floridians REJECT anti-solar Amendment 1!

We are excited to announce that Floridians rejected the deceptive, utility-backed Amendment 1, which would have halted solar development by paving the way for utilities to penalize solar customers. As a founding member of Floridians for Solar Choice (FSC), the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) has been leading efforts to bring more solar energy to Florida. Over [...]

Lafayette restores smart solar policy

Late on November 7th, a local Lafayette, Louisiana newspaper (The Independent) posted a story: “About-face: LUS seeks repeal of ‘solar tax’ ordinance”. Lafayette is restoring its smart solar policy!

TGIF! Paris Climate Agreement Officially International Law

Today, the historic Paris Agreement, our first global agreement to limit carbon emissions and keep the global average temperature increase below 20C, officially became international law. Happy Friday, Earth!

192 countries signed the historic agreement, including the United States, agreeing to reduce carbon pollution at the 2015 gathering of countries engaged in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Paris. To date, 97 countries have formally joined the Paris accord, or ratified the agreement, with more countries expected to officially jump on board in the coming weeks and months.

Local utility quietly clouds solar future

But this past August, our local electric utility company passed perhaps the worst solar power policy in the south. Lafayette Utilities System (LUS) introduced an extremely complicated electric, water and sewer rate increase the same week historic, 1,000-year flooding occurred in Louisiana. The new rate structure for net metered customers, including solar power families like mine, is likely to double monthly electric bills, and double the length of time it takes for a solar panel system to pay for itself. The new policy effectively acts as a giant tax on solar power. Solar tax credits are being phased out, and when coupled with LUS’s new solar tax, it is unlikely that solar power systems would ever pay for themselves.