Florida Solar Month: When and where do I vote during August Primary election?

#FloridaSolarMonth continues with this blog on when and where to vote in the August Primary election.

Florida Solar Month: What’s on the ballot for the August Primary election?

Florida Solar Month: What’s on the ballot for the August Primary election? This question will depend on which county in Florida you are registered to vote in. To find your sample ballot, find your local Supervisor of Elections who manages the voting in your community. For easy access we’ve linked the websites below for the bigger counties in Florida where we anticipate voter turnout to be high.

Florida Solar Month: Learn about Amendment 4 on August Primary Ballot

Florida Solar Month: There are SEVERAL educational events happening across Florida this month, so we’ve listed them all in one place! Understanding what’s on your primary ballot is important, so we ask that try to attend these events (or tune in via phone or web!) to learn more about Amendment 4. If you have an event to add to the list, leave a comment. Go solar!

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Jill Stein

The Green Party recently announced its 2016 presidential candidate: Dr. Jill Stein. Stein was the party’s nominee in 2012, but this year she hopes to benefit from higher levels of voter discontent in order to lead her to the White House. The Green Party has developed a “four pillar” platform based on “peace, ecology, social justice and democracy.” While this blog is not meant to be a comprehensive assessment of Dr. Jill Stein’s stance on energy issues, we hope it provides a general overview for evaluating where she may stand on issues of interest to energy-focused voters: coal, climate change, renewables, efficiency, natural gas, nuclear and drilling.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Hillary Clinton

This post is the second in a series of blogs examining where 2016 candidates for President or Governor of North Carolina stand on key energy issues. Note: The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy does not support or oppose candidates or political parties. Links to reports, candidate websites and outside sources are provided as citizen education tools.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Donald Trump

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: Donald Trump

Good ideas trump partisanship

It seems if an idea makes sense, political persuasion isn’t all that important. Just a few days ago, we reported that increasing numbers of Republicans support wind power. Now, two new studies quantify just how much that support has grown in recent years. Lazard Ltd., a financial advisory and asset management firm, just released a survey showing strong support for renewable energy from voters on both sides of the aisle. The change in attitudes among self-described conservatives is particularly striking.

Sparks Fly at FPL Rate Hike Public Hearings

You would think that $1.65 billion dollars would be enough profit for Florida Power and Light (FPL) – Florida’s biggest power company. Yet, it recently proposed a 24% rate hike on customers that includes a request for an additional $240 million dollars in pure profit. A series of public hearings on the FPL rate hike recently concluded in south Florida – and sparks flew.

EPA Moves Forward As Harvard Recognizes Billions of “Hidden” Clean Power Plan Benefits

Despite the setback delivered by the Supreme Court’s stay, action around the Clean Power Plan has not disappeared. Instead, the Environmental Protection Agency’s historic regulation is on the verge of another public input period and is also the focus of a recent Harvard study.

What’s more, EPA has a new proposal out and an upcoming public comment period related to the voluntary early-action piece of the Clean Power Plan, known as the Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP). After hearing from stakeholders during a previous public comment period that ended in mid-December 2015, EPA has made some significant changes to the proposed CEIP. Most importantly, EPA has expanded the range of projects eligible for CEIP participation to include solar projects implemented to serve low-income communities.

As Utilities Embrace Clean Energy, Southeast Needs Smart Policies to Promote Local Renewables Growth

Even utilities in our notoriously coal-dependent Southeast are getting in on the action. Duke Energy, one of the two biggest utilities in our region, in late April announced plans to increase its renewable energy capacity to 8,000 megawatts by 2020, up by one-third over previous targets. “We’re finding that it’s competitive” on a cost basis, Duke Energy company spokesman Randy Wheeless has said of renewables. “It makes good business sense.” The Atlanta-based Southern Company, parent company of Alabama Power, Georgia Power, Gulf Power, and Mississippi Power, intends to exceed its previously announced renewables totals for 2017 and 2018 and just bought a North Carolina company, PowerSecure, that focuses on distributed generation—smaller-scale local power often provided by renewable sources—along with energy efficiency. NextEra Energy, based in Juno, Florida and the parent of that state’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light (FPL), is a national leader in wind power development. “We continue to believe that the fundamentals for the North American renewables business have never been stronger,” NextEra Executive Vice President of Finance and CFO John Ketchum said on an April 28th earnings call.