EPA Hosts Clean Power Plan Public Hearings in Atlanta

The Clean Power Plan sets emission reduction goals that each state must meet by 2030, based on that state’s historic generation and unique energy portfolio. States are given a wide range of compliance options and ample time to craft state specific compliance plans that are flexible, economically viable and protect grid reliability.

EPA will host two days of public hearings in Atlanta, as well as a few other cities across the country, to take public input on a few key parts of the Clean Power Plan – the Proposed Federal Rule and Model Training Rules and the Clean Energy Incentive Program. The official public comment period for these pieces ends on January 21, 2016, but EPA is hosting public hearings early for those who want to provide input before the deadline.

Halloween Costume Guide: The Tricks and Treats of Fighting for Clean Energy

Here at SACE, we work very hard to move the Southeast towards clean energy solutions, but we also like to help out in other fun ways, such as assisting readers with last minute Halloween costumes.

We put our heads together to come up with some fun costume ideas that could speak some interesting conversations during . And who knows, maybe this list will inspire you with a different idea. We give bonus points for sticking to a clean energy theme, because there’s nothing like a Halloween costume to spark some climate action conversation with your friends and family.

Happy Halloween! Enjoy our tricks and treats of clean energy.

Florida’s Highest Court Approves Solar Choice

This week marks an important milestone for solar policy in the Southeast, specifically Florida. Florida’s Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that the language proposed by the Floridians for Solar Choice ballot initiative is unambiguous and single-subject, meaning that this initiative now has a green light to be on Florida’s general election ballot in November of [...]

Guest Post: Clean Power Plan Can Boost Energy Efficiency Investments in Affordable Housing

Low-income households are disproportionately burdened by exposure to toxins in the atmosphere and the built environment. Climate change compounds these vulnerabilities when unstable weather patterns increase exposure and/or the potency of toxic chemicals in our environment. Additionally, low-income households are often forced to make housing choices in which they rely on inadequate or lower quality housing. Poor ventilation can cause homes to be drafty in winter and allow in moisture in summer that leads to mold and illness. Poor construction and inefficient appliances and energy grid connections leave families unable to safely maintain comfortable temperatures, leaving them further vulnerable to illness or potentially deadly accidents.

Beyond Admiration: Changing the Energy Efficiency Conversation

“You coming or going?” a gruff voice asked as I tightened my seatbelt and settled in for my flight from Little Rock to Dallas.  I turned towards my seatmate, a large man with scuffed cowboy boots, extensive tattoos and a long, gray beard, and told him I was headed back home after a very informative [...]

How Do I Go Solar?

This is a guest post by John Rogers, senior energy analyst for the Union of Concerned Scientists. John has expertise in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies and policies, and he co-manages the Energy and Water in a Warming World Initiative (EW3) at UCS that looks at water demands of energy production in the context [...]

5 Reasons Utilities Are Hating on Their Solar-Producing Customers

This is a guest post by John Farrell, who is the Director of Democratic Energy at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and widely known as the guru of distributed energy. The original post can be viewed here. It seems crazy that electric companies would have anything against customers that spend their own money to reduce [...]

Is TVA’s New Integrated Resource Plan a Wise Path Forward?

In reflecting on the Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) 2015 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) in a recent blog, our research director pointed out that “TVA’s 20-year plan looks at the ground we stand on, sketches some ideas for tomorrow, but does not really scan future horizons.” So, what should TVA’s Board do to take this plan from sketches to concrete action?

If TVA Reinvented its Fire

One of the questions I often get asked is what it would take for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA),  or any other large utility, to move to 100% renewable energy and energy efficiency. That question comes up more and more often as people learn about TVA’s  2015 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP). Even though TVA’s IRP [...]

6 Things Every American Should Know About the Clean Power Plan

This blogpost was written by EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and originally published on August 3rd on EPA Connect Blog here. Today, President Obama will unveil the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Clean Power Plan—a historic step to cut the carbon pollution driving climate change. Here are six key things every American should know: 1. IT SLASHES [...]