Guest Post: Rural Electric Cooperatives Improve Energy Efficiency with On-Bill Financing

Guest Post from Marilynn Marsh-Robinson with Environmental Defense Fund: Most Americans think their electricity comes from large power companies. In North Carolina, my home state, that might mean Duke Energy or Dominion Resources. But did you know that 42 million people in 47 states get their electricity from electric cooperatives? These member-owned electric utilities were first formed back in the 1930s to provide electricity to people living in rural areas and small towns.

A Tale of Two Utilities: Post-Merger Duke Sees Growth in Carolina Energy Efficiency

Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress have the opportunity to take a leadership role in how energy efficiency programs are implemented in the Southeast. The companies can and should design and implement programs that reach a broad customer market and place additional emphasis on increasing customer participation in its EE/DSM programs to deepen the energy savings results.

JEA Staff Aims to Weaken Net Metering – Will its Board Agree?

At the February 16th JEA Board meeting, JEA staff asked its board to approve several solar initiatives – but one of them is a step backwards for customers that with to generate their own solar power. The staff is aggressively pushing its board to adopt a significant reduction in the credit that is provided to customers that send power back to the grid through JEA’s net metering policy.

Honoring Black History Month and the Path Towards Energy Justice: Energy Efficiency and Economic Stability in Memphis

In cities as old and historic as Memphis, TN, there are often many older, inefficient homes where energy seeps out through leaky windows, doors and poorly insulated attics. A city often remembered for its role in the Civil Rights Movement, Memphis is a majority-minority city with African-Americans comprising around 63% of the population. As of 2010, almost 27% of Memphians were living in poverty – and only a little more than half of the city (51%) owned their own homes. The other half of Memphians live in multi-family housing, like apartment buildings, duplexes, and condominiums, where families have less control over the energy efficiency of their residences.

Arlicia Gilliams is one Memphian who used to live in an extremely inefficient apartment that lost energy through poorly sealed doors, windows and a poorly sealed attic. Although gainfully employed and working hard, Ms. Gilliams was struggling to meet unnecessarily high utility bills while also on the search to buy a house. Now, Ms. Gilliams is the proud owner of a new energy efficient home built by Habitat for Humanity.

Southeast Energy Savings Pacesetter: Entergy Arkansas Breaks the 1% Barrier

This is the first entry in a new blog series entitled Energy Savings in the Southeast. We will dive into the recent performance of Southeastern utilities’ energy efficiency programs, and highlight how the region can achieve more money-saving and carbon-reducing energy savings. Future posts in this series can be found here. Entergy Arkansas has forced a paradigm shift in the [...]

Winter Is Coming – Keeping warm with eco-friendly insulation

KEEPING WARM WITH ECO-FRIENDLY INSULATION – Insulation is easily one of the most effective ways to make a house more temperate all year round. If you’re cold, you typically put a sweater on before you turn up the heat. Insulation is just a home’s sweater!

EmPower TN Selects First-Round Energy Efficiency Projects for $33.6 Million in Funding

Thanks to proactive investment in energy efficiency, the Volunteer State is one step closer to seeing significant reductions in the utility bills paid by state-operated facilities. The Tennessee Office of Customer Focused Government recently announced the selection of the first round of funding under the EmPower TN program, which will provide $33.6 million for 33 projects. [...]

EPA Hosts Clean Power Plan Public Hearings in Atlanta

The Clean Power Plan sets emission reduction goals that each state must meet by 2030, based on that state’s historic generation and unique energy portfolio. States are given a wide range of compliance options and ample time to craft state specific compliance plans that are flexible, economically viable and protect grid reliability.

EPA will host two days of public hearings in Atlanta, as well as a few other cities across the country, to take public input on a few key parts of the Clean Power Plan – the Proposed Federal Rule and Model Training Rules and the Clean Energy Incentive Program. The official public comment period for these pieces ends on January 21, 2016, but EPA is hosting public hearings early for those who want to provide input before the deadline.

Halloween Costume Guide: The Tricks and Treats of Fighting for Clean Energy

Here at SACE, we work very hard to move the Southeast towards clean energy solutions, but we also like to help out in other fun ways, such as assisting readers with last minute Halloween costumes.

We put our heads together to come up with some fun costume ideas that could speak some interesting conversations during . And who knows, maybe this list will inspire you with a different idea. We give bonus points for sticking to a clean energy theme, because there’s nothing like a Halloween costume to spark some climate action conversation with your friends and family.

Happy Halloween! Enjoy our tricks and treats of clean energy.

Florida’s Highest Court Approves Solar Choice

This week marks an important milestone for solar policy in the Southeast, specifically Florida. Florida’s Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that the language proposed by the Floridians for Solar Choice ballot initiative is unambiguous and single-subject, meaning that this initiative now has a green light to be on Florida’s general election ballot in November of [...]