Florida Voters: Learn what candidates for office plan to do about sea level rise

Want to learn where your local candidates for office stand when it comes to sea level rise, flooding and other related issues? Tidal Town Halls — hosted by ReThink Energy Florida — are being held in 15 cities throughout Florida, offering Floridians a chance to hear directly from candidates about their plans for addressing sea […]

Why Florida’s west coast needs a regional approach to address sea level rise, hurricanes and more

With the Tampa area ranking as the most vulnerable metro area in the nation to damage from storm surge flooding, it’s clear that Florida’s west coast region needs to act now to make its communities more resilient. An effort is under way to bring local governments in the region together to form the Tampa Bay Regional Resiliency Coalition, allowing west coast counties and municipalities to work together toward solutions to mitigate and adapt to the changing climate, including challenges like flooding and increasingly powerful hurricanes. Read more in this excerpt from the Tampa Bay Times, written by Pinellas County Commissioner Janet Long and SACE Florida Director Susan Glickman:

Hurricanes and Climate Change in South Florida: Brainstorming Solutions

At a community gathering at Miami’s CIC, Radical Partners announced “100 Great Ideas” focused on crowdsourcing climate resilience and sustainability solutions. NASA senior scientist Dr. Timothy Hall presented the latest science on the impact of climate change on hurricanes at the event, including increasing hurricane intensity, the upper limits of hurricane strength, and how climate change affects storm surge, coastal flooding and precipitation patterns. A collaboration between the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Miami Climate Alliance, Radical Partners, The New Tropic, and ReThink Energy Florida, the event also featured a participant-driven discussion of policy and solutions.

Hurricanes and Climate Change – What We Know for 2018 Season

Hurricane season officially begins today and runs through November. This is the six month period when hurricanes typically occur in the Atlantic. The beginning of the season is a good time to make sure you are prepared for hurricane impacts, should one threaten your area. But in addition to making sure our households are prepared for the short-term forecast of hurricanes this season, we must also make sure our communities are prepared for the impacts of hurricanes in the long term, by seeking to understand how hurricane risk may change in the years to come and how we can avoid the worst outcomes.

Bolting From Hurricane Irma: Maximizing the benefits of solar and an electric vehicle

The official end to Hurricane Season 2017 is today, November 30.  It was an especially unforgiving season and as we reflect back we wanted to share a story on how renewable energy and electric vehicles can offer benefits. The following is an account from two local Florida residents that we interviewed on how they fared […]

Walk Like An Egyptian: What Climate Change Studies of Ancient Egypt May Teach Us Today

The study of ancient history provides many examples of how civilizations around the world rose and then fell due to a wide range of factors: famine, warfare, geological catastrophe, or disease. Archeologists have previously unearthed evidence of environmental changes suddenly wiping out a civilization, such as the 300-year drought that decimated the Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia […]

Winter is coming! Which prediction should you trust?

In the battle of the winter weather predictions, what a great showdown we have in store this year! The “timeless” Farmers’ Almanac says, “the Southeast will see below normal winter temperatures with an unseasonable chill reaching as far south as the Gulf Coast, with above-average precipitation.” According to Mother Nature Network, its prediction is based on […]

Harvey, Irma, Jose and the shocks and hazards of place

This blog was originally posted here by Mary Babic at Oxfam America on September 8, 2017. Oxfam worked with the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute (HVRI) to develop a series of Social Vulnerability maps for the southeastern states in the US. These maps measure and illustrate the convergence of social vulnerability factors (such as economic standing and age, among others) and four environmental hazards: flooding, hurricane force winds, sea-level rise, and drought.

How Will Hurricane Irma Impact Coal Ash in her Path?

Last year, Hurricane Matthew spilled coal waste into the Neuse River and burst the dirt embankment of a cooling pond at the H.F. Lee power plant in Goldsboro, NC. As record-breaking Hurricane Irma barrels toward Florida and likely up toward Atlanta, at least 33 coal-fired power plants lie in her potential path, highlighting the dangers […]

Climate Signals and Hurricane Irma

Climate change is amplifying the damage done by hurricanes, by elevating sea levels and extending the reach of storm surge and by fueling storms with greater rainfall. Climate change may also be driving the observed trend of increasing hurricane intensity as well as the observed trend of more rapidly intensifying hurricanes. In addition there is significant evidence linking climate change to the observed shift in the track of hurricanes such as Irma toward the US coast.