Delivering low-cost renewable energy to the Southeast

Wind resources from western Oklahoma and Texas – where the Clean Line and Pattern Energy transmission line projects will source wind – are being marketed at prices around $20-30 per MWh. That’s comparable to the price of operating a modern natural gas power plant, making wind not only cost-effective but a guaranteed low-cost electricity source for decades in the future.

Amendment 1: Trick or Treat for Florida Voters?

With the spirit of Halloween on our minds, we just had to blog about the tricky, utility-backed Amendment 1 on the ballot in Florida. Over the past few months, over 185 organizations, local businesses, and elected officials have banded together to fight this “wolf in sheep’s clothing.” There has also been 27 newspaper editorials, shining the light on this misleading, power grab from Florida’s big monopoly utilities, who do not want their captive ratepayers to go solar.

Are We Understating the Potential for (and Uncertainty in) Wind Energy Cost Reductions?

The single most-significant difference came from the so-called ‘leading experts’: a hand-selected group of 22 individuals who are among the wind sector’s most knowledgeable and senior leaders. Those experts were, on average, even more optimistic about wind energy cost reduction, expecting LCOE to decline by 27% by 2030 and 48% by 2050 in the median scenario, and by 57% and 66% in the low scenario (Figure 4). The views of this group suggest even greater potential for cost reduction than noted earlier.

Building a Resilient Energy Plan. Step One: Diverse Community Engagement

This post is the first in a series of blogs that will follow the efforts of Western North Carolina’s Energy Innovation Task Force to reduce peak load in the region through demand response, energy efficiency and clean energy solutions. SACE participates in the Task Force’s Peak Reduction and Programs working groups.

Asheville, North Carolina is no stranger to sustainability. Nestled in the rolling hills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the City was one of the first in North Carolina to adopt a Sustainability Management Plan in 2009, which established a municipal carbon reduction goal of 4 percent each year. In 2013, the City implemented an LED streetlight replacement program, replacing over 9,000 aging streetlights with a more efficient LED version, and has experienced a 28.6% reduction in its municipal carbon footprint since 2008.

Solar In The Southeast, Fall Update

Thanks to weak or non-existent policies, inconsistent incentives, and a myriad of other excuses, the Southeast, as a whole, has yet to live up to its high solar potential. The last several months have brought some interesting developments though, some good and some challenging. Here’s a quick overview of the key takeaways, from North to South.

Public window into Florida utility planning opens, shuts

While Floridians await a Public Service Commission (PSC) ruling later this year on a 24% rate hike for Florida Power & Light, the Commission is also considering another matter: acceptance of Ten Year Site Plans from the largest state utilities. The Ten Year Site Plan is a summary of Florida’s largest power companies’ resource plans for the next ten years. This year’s Site Plans rely on continuing to run old coal plants and building more natural gas fired power.

Where the 2016 Candidates Stand on Energy Issues: NC Attorney General Roy Cooper

This post is the final in a series of blogs examining where 2016 candidates for President or Governor of North Carolina stand on key energy issues.  Note: The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) does not support or oppose candidates or political parties. Links to reports, candidate websites and outside sources are provided as citizen education tools. SACE’s [...]

Georgia Tax Exemption Can Improve Project Economics

Georgia has a number of tax exemptions that could potentially apply to solar and other electric power generation projects. One that can really impact project economics is Georgia’s tangible personal property tax exemption for manufacturers. Whether or not that exemption applies to power projects, including solar and wind projects, is a tricky question – there is no clear line for power project eligibility. As of about a year ago, Georgia stopped giving advance approval (or denial) of eligibility for the exemption. And Georgia does not give written opinions regarding eligibility.

Chattanoogans Ask TVA for Help With Energy Efficiency

This blog is the third in a series SACE is publishing on recent energy efficiency advocacy meetings between Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and community members across the Tennessee Valley. The first blog, focusing on TVA customers in rural East Tennessee, can be found here, and the second blog, focusing on customers in Memphis, can be [...]

“Deceptive Language Award” Presented to Utility Companies Supporting Florida’s Amendment 1

This is a guest post from the Clear Language Institute located in Sarasota, Florida — The Clear Language Institute Publicly Recognizes “World Class Deception” in Proposed Amendment That Uses Language to Purposely Mislead and Confuse Voters