Solar Amendment Implementation Moving Along

Thanks to lots of hard work by solar supporters across the state of Florida, legislation to implement Amendment 4 – which passed with 73% of the vote on the August ballot – is moving along in the State Capitol. Voters strongly supported removing barriers to solar by reducing taxes on solar systems. Both Senate and [...]

Gulf Power Settlement is WIN for Consumers, Energy Efficiency, & Solar

Customers won big this month when Gulf Power, in a settlement of its proposed rate hike, pulled back on a requested huge increase in the fixed charge portion of customers’ bills. A big hike in the fixed charge would have unfairly penalized families that conserve and use less power and those that wish to use rooftop solar power. It would have also hit low and fixed income especially hard.

Time for Virgin Islands to Transfer Power, to Renewables

There’s already a high level of self-sufficiency in St. Croix – where many, many homes rely almost entirely on rainwater cisterns for their freshwater supply. As batteries and residential renewable energy become cheaper, many residents may willfully follow Mr. Boyd’s footsteps, and begin to fully opt-out of the Virgin Island electric system by going off grid. But for economies of scale, utility-scale renewables and large batteries can pack a big economic punch. Lower systemwide power prices can help reduce electric bills, but also attract new companies seeking paradise on a dime. Meanwhile, brandishing ecological credentials could improve the islands’ largest industry: tourism. In the Netherlands, tourists readily pay for windmill and wind farm excursions.
As the Virgin Islands celebrate the 100th anniversary of Transfer Day, let’s hope it won’t take another 100 years for renewable energy.

New Executive Order Threatens US Progress on Climate Action

Given his appointment of Scott Pruitt as Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – a man with a long history of challenging health-based environmental regulations in court – President Trump’s Energy Independence Executive Order, released today, is not unexpected.

Cloaked in a patriotic narrative, President Trump’s executive order does more to threaten our nation’s energy independence than support it. Renewable energy has a critical role to play in strengthening our country’s energy independence, yet this executive order is aimed at weakening our ability to incorporate more clean energy resources into our national energy portfolio.

It also doubles down on the false claim that the coal industry can be saved by dialing back public health regulations. In truth, coal is being beaten in the free market by cheaper natural gas and cheap renewable energy.

Today’s executive order – coupled with the President’s recently proposed large budget cuts to the EPA and Department of Energy (DOE) clean energy, smart grid and storage technology research programs – makes it clear that this Administration is not serious about protecting our health, our climate or our national security.

Clearing the Air: Lamar Alexander, You’re Wrong About Wind Power

Sen. Alexander says that wind power is expensive. However, his information is outdated. With its considerable wind energy resources, Oklahoma had the lowest electricity prices in the country last year. Tennessee ranked #28. Analysis by Leidos Electrical shows that Plains and Eastern Clean Line project could more than likely reduce electric rates in the Tennessee Valley, and beyond. In November 2016, Lazard Associates published their annual Levelized Cost of Energy analysis showing that the lowest cost wind power resources reach $14/MWh (1.4 cents per kilowatt hour, kWh). A new report from Moody’s Investor Services reports wind power prices for $15/MWh (1.5 cents per kWh). In 2015, Georgia Power received wind power proposals with pricing of $15.77/MWh (1.577 cents per kWh). As an already-operating wind project, the Balko Wind project in western Oklahoma sold wind power to the Public Service Company of Oklahoma for $15.80/MWh (1.58 cents per kWh). HVDC transmission charges may add an additional 2 cents per kWh. Additionally, TVA can earn revenue by using their existing transmission system to “wheel” low-cost wind power to power-hungry neighbors.

Solar Customer to Central Georgia EMC: No Justification For Discriminating Against Solar Customers

Our family became interested in going solar in spring of 2015 to save money and help the environment. We did extensive research, including multiple discussions with our power provider, Central Georgia EMC , and a several solar installers, and finally made the investment once it was clear that it was a prudent thing to do. Fast forward two years, and Central Georgia EMC (CGEMC) has violated our original agreement and enacted unjustified fees against solar households like ours. The EMC cannot give a good explanation as to why they are cheating solar customers. We are waiting for a proper explanation, and as is to be expected from any business, some basic customer service. Here is our story.

Energy matters. It powers our lives.

Energy has transformed our world into the society we enjoy today. It cools our homes in the summer, heats them in the winter and transports us to wherever we are going.

Avangrid Renewables Wins North Carolina’s First Offshore Wind Lease for $9 Million

This blog post was co-written by SACE Renewable Energy Manager Simon Mahan and Coastal Climate & Energy Manager Chris Carnevale. North Carolina’s first offshore wind lease sale was held today and Avangrid Renewables was named provisional winner of the lease sale, having offered the high bid of $9,066,650, outbidding three other companies. As the provisional [...]

What to Expect in North Carolina’s Offshore Wind Lease Sale This Week

Tomorrow will mark the first lease sale for offshore wind off of North Carolina’s coast. We thought it may be useful to explain what this means and what the process looks like going forward for offshore wind in North Carolina. Below, we will discuss some of the basics about the lease sale, including what exactly it is, where it will cover, what the winner of the lease will and won’t be able to do with the lease, and what comes next in the process. We hope you find this a helpful guide.

OKLAHOMA is kicking butt with wind power

Just over 6,600 megawatts of installed wind power capacity exists in the Sooner State – enough to meet about 25% of the state’s annual electricity needs – more than what coal provides. Oklahoma installed nearly 2,000 megawatts in 2016 alone. By the end of the year, Oklahoma became third in the nation for the most wind power installed.