How Clean Energy and Birds Can Coexist

Guest blog from Audubon CEO David Yarnold: Clean energy—led by solar and wind power—is expanding quickly both in the U.S. and abroad, thanks to the economic opportunities they present as well as the momentum spurred by the recent Paris Agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Renewable energy is an important way to rein in climate change and its harmful impacts on birds. At the same time, it’s crucial to choose locations for new solar farms, wind turbines, and other installations with consideration for the local habitat and wildlife.

Nuclear power carries extreme, persistent risks

Below is a guest blog post, published with permission, of an opinion editorial by William H. Schlesinger, Dean Emeritus at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University, that originally ran in the Charlotte Observer on January 25, 2016. You can find the original publication here. We added the map to this post showing nuclear [...]

Putting the “modern” in Duke Energy’s modernization plan

On January 26, in Asheville, our communities will have their only chance to speak on Duke Energy’s plans for Western North Carolina at a public hearing of the North Carolina Utilities Commission. This is the final chapter in a long campaign that has brought our communities together in the fight for a smarter, cleaner energy future.

Coal Ash Stories – Coming to Florida This Month!

We’re kicking off a series of screenings from January 28th – February 2nd and will be hosting events in Sarasota, Tampa, Lakeland, Jacksonville, and Pensacola.

What was Georgia Power doing at Plant Branch on New Year’s weekend?

“I am deeply concerned about what sounds like pumping of water into Lake Sinclair. If this is coming directly from the coal ash ponds into the lake, it could pose a threat to our community on the lake as well as many others who utilize its waters. Georgia Power appears to be deliberately dumping coal ash waste directly into the lake. I am surprised that no-one I spoke with on Lake Sinclair had been notified in any way by Georgia Power of their activities.”

Winter Is Coming – Keeping warm with eco-friendly insulation

KEEPING WARM WITH ECO-FRIENDLY INSULATION – Insulation is easily one of the most effective ways to make a house more temperate all year round. If you’re cold, you typically put a sweater on before you turn up the heat. Insulation is just a home’s sweater!

Fool’s Gold? Nuclear Power and Climate Change

Below is a guest blog post with permission to re-post from Gregory Jaczko, former U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Chairman and Commissioner, originally published in the Huffington Post’s “The Blog” on December 14, 2015, which can be found here. Back in 2012, then-Chairman Jaczko was the only NRC Commissioner who voted against issuing the combined operating [...]

Investors and Businesses Back A Strong Paris Climate Agreement

This guest post is by Christopher N. Fox at Ceres and was originally published here on Ceres’ blog, Clean Trillion. The UN climate conference now underway in Paris represents a critical opportunity to limit the risks of climate change and accelerate the shift to clean energy.  That’s why Ceres and leading investors and businesses are [...]

To Experience Art and Climate Change, Visit Hialeah!

This blog by Erin N. Marcus, M.D was originally published on Huffington Post on December 3 here. It is reprinted with permission from the author. Forget the Champs Elysees. If you really want to experience climate change this week, travel west along the banks of the C-6 canal and through the clots of cars on South [...]

Amazon ‘Desert Wind’ Project: Benefiting Eastern NC and Beyond

Construction began this summer on the first utility-scale wind farm in North Carolina, and one of the first in the southeastern U.S., the Amazon Wind Farm US East, powered by Iberdrola Renewables. This exciting development in rural northeastern North Carolina will deliver significant local economic benefits over the life of the project, starting with a huge boost for local companies and workers during construction. It will soon be the largest taxpayer in each of the two counties where it’s located, and combined with landowner lease payments, will inject more than $1.1 million into the local economy each year.