The Changing Solar Landscape in the Southeastern US

The Southeastern US is not typically synonymous with aggressive renewable energy strategies, but several factors over the past several years are changing the trajectory.

Overshadowed by coal ash issue, debate continues over Duke Energy’s fixed charge

As a high-profile hearing over Duke Energy’s proposed rate hike in North Carolina logged its seventh day, an expert witness for anti-poverty and environmental groups said the utility’s own data prove it should lower – not raise – the flat monthly fee it levies on residential customers.

Guest Blog: Resilience is military’s new energy focus. Will it bear fruit in North Carolina?

Guest Blog: Resilience is military’s new energy focus. Will it bear fruit in North Carolina?

Guest Commentary: A time to break down, a time to build up: energy equity and the Southeast’s future

This is a guest post originally published by Southeast Energy News. To read the original article, click here. SACE’s own Amelia Shenstone was one of five “clean energy energy superheroes” awarded during the #ATL100 event for her leadership on energy efficiency throughout the Southeast.

Vogtle, the Law of Holes, and Two Modest Proposals

Ever hear of the law of holes? If you’re in one, stop digging. This blog was originally posted here by Steve Huntoon at RTO Insider on September 11, 2017. An excerpt is below, published with permission. Steve Huntoon is a former president of the Energy Bar Association, with 30 years of experience advising and representing energy [...]

Harvey, Irma, Jose and the shocks and hazards of place

This blog was originally posted here by Mary Babic at Oxfam America on September 8, 2017. Oxfam worked with the Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute (HVRI) to develop a series of Social Vulnerability maps for the southeastern states in the US. These maps measure and illustrate the convergence of social vulnerability factors (such as economic standing and age, among others) and four environmental hazards: flooding, hurricane force winds, sea-level rise, and drought.

Climate Signals and Hurricane Irma

Climate change is amplifying the damage done by hurricanes, by elevating sea levels and extending the reach of storm surge and by fueling storms with greater rainfall. Climate change may also be driving the observed trend of increasing hurricane intensity as well as the observed trend of more rapidly intensifying hurricanes. In addition there is significant evidence linking climate change to the observed shift in the track of hurricanes such as Irma toward the US coast.

Walking in Memphis—Just Feet Above a Coal Ash Cesspool

Memphis residents now have another reason to sing the blues. Last week, the nation’s largest public utility, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), admitted that the groundwater beneath its Allen coal-burning power plant is poisoned with astronomically high amounts of arsenic. Levels of the potent carcinogen measure nearly 400 times the federal limit for drinking water. In addition, lead in the groundwater is more than four times the standard.

Utilities Knew: Documenting Electric Utilities’ Early Knowledge and Ongoing Deception on Climate Change From 1968-2017

Despite early knowledge about climate change, electric utilities have continued to invest heavily in fossil fuel power generation over the past half a century, and since 1988 some have engaged in ongoing efforts to sow doubt about climate science and block legal limits on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.
The Energy and Policy Institute’s new report provides a first look into the electric utility industry’s nearly 50-year long relationship with climate science, based largely on original research that reviewed scores of industry documents:

History in Florida: Ladies & Gentlemen Start Your Engines, The Solar Race Has Begun

South Miami passed a law that makes Florida only the second state in the United States where a municipality has such a law (the other being California) and only the fourth city in our country that will now mandate solar power be installed in newly built homes or those subject to material renovation.