Taller Turbines: Big win(d) for Georgia

New wind speeds maps released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrate the greatly increased potential for wind turbine development in Georgia with advanced turbines. As wind turbines increase in height, Georgia contains a much greater area of land viable for development. The shading on the map below represents new available land for wind development with modern turbine towers of 360 feet (110 meters) achieving a 35% capacity factor or greater. With these turbines, over 8,000 megawatts (MW) of land-based wind potential currently exists in Georgia.

7 Places to Drink Green On St. Patrick’s Day

While some think that dying a river or lager is drinking green, there’s plenty of places to truly drink green in the U.S. this St Patrick’s Day or anytime on our next vacation. Here are seven examples of wind powered breweries, wineries, and distilleries.

Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center: Ten Years of Clean, Homegrown Energy!

Commissioned in 2004, Invenergy’s Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center (“Buffalo Mountain”) is now celebrating its tenth year in operation.

Will Georgia Power add more wind energy to its mix?

Georgia Power Company could be adding more wind power to its electricity portfolio. Today Georgia Power issued a request for information (RFI) on wind generation resources. The RFI will give wind energy developers the opportunity to submit information on wind energy opportunities for Georgia Power and its customers.

Solar energy future bright for Georgia

The solar industry has Georgia on their mind.

The Peach State is now the fastest growing solar market in the country with over 90 megawatts of solar installed in 2013. Recent findings from The Pew Charitable Trusts concluded that from 2009-2012, Georgia attracted $666 million in private clean energy investment.

Are Wind Turbines Too Big?

New wind turbine technology is a game changer for wind energy opportunities in the Southeast. In just five years, wind turbines have greatly evolved to be more suitable across the region. Taller turbines and longer blades are capable of capturing more wind, which results in harnessing more electricity and reducing costs. But are these wind turbines too big?

Taller turbines: Big win(d) for the Southeast

As wind turbines grow taller, they also grow greener.

SACE’s new analysis released earlier this month showed that advanced turbine technology is a game changer for wind energy in the Southeast. Taller turbines and longer blades are capable of capturing more wind, which results in harnessing more electricity and reducing costs. So, how powerful are these new turbines? Our new fact sheet below shows that 600 is the magical number:

What happens when the wind doesn’t blow?

It’s likely you’ve heard the argument that renewable energy is unreliable because the wind doesn’t always blow and the sun doesn’t always shine. It’s true that renewable resources are variable. We can’t make the wind blow and the sun shine 24 hours a day. That’s just nature. But, does this mean that large amounts of solar and wind can’t be incorporated into the grid?

It’s time to set the record straight.

Why 2015 Will Be a Pivotal Year for the US Offshore Wind Industry

Last week I attended the American Wind Energy Association’s (AWEA) annual offshore WINDPOWER conference in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Wind energy developers, government officials, non-profit advocates, and academia came together to discuss exciting developments in the U.S. offshore wind energy industry.

Why the South is the Next Frontier for Wind Energy

Advanced turbine technology is a game changer for wind energy in the Southeast. In just five years, wind turbine technology has greatly evolved to be more suitable for lower wind speeds areas like the Southeast.